Why Aren’t We Teaching You Mindfulness | AnneMarie Rossi | [email protected]


Translator: Sarah Braun
Reviewer: Denise RQ Harvard conducted a research study and they tracked more than 1,000 people from birth until age 32, looking for what made someone successful. What common characteristic or trait
was seen in a successful individual? It wasn’t their race,
what language they spoke, what neighbourhood they grow up in,
or how much money their parents had. It wasn’t how well they did
on standardized tests, or even their IQ. It was self-control. Those who were successful,
who had good careers, financial stability, loving relationships, and physical health, were the ones who could focus, pay attention, and regulate
their emotions. They were the ones
to practice mindfulness. It doesn’t matter if I give you
all the shiniest new iPads, and Stephen Hawkings is teaching you Math,
if you can’t focus and pay attention, how well will you do? Mindfulness is the foundation
for all other learning, for all success you will have
throughout your entire life. So I ask you, why, if we know that this is the single most important
predictor of success for human beings, why aren’t we teaching it to you? Mindfulness exercises are designed
to train your brain to have focus, attention, and emotional regulation. There’s mindful listening,
eating, breathing, movement; it’s a way of engaging
in the present moment, without attachment and without judgment. Mindfulness is grounded in more
than 30 years of scientific study, most major universities in the world,
Harvard, MIT, Stanford, Yale, Oxford and Cambridge, just to name a few,
teach and/or research this practice. In fact, Oxford has
a Master’s Degree in mindfulness. This isn’t religion,
this isn’t hippie nonsense, this isn’t some idea
I came up with in my backyard. This is science. There exist literally thousands of studies that show us that mindfulness practice
decreases depression, anxiety, and stress; increases overall feelings
of well-being, happiness, focus, attention, and academic achievement. So, I ask you again: why if we know this, why aren’t we teaching mindfulness to you? We are inundated with distractions; our phones, our tablets, all the sights
and sounds that surround us. The never ending dialogue
our brain is having with itself. The ability to focus on one thing
at a time for an extended period is a skill and it requires practice. You all know what I’m talking about. You’re sitting in your class, and you’re pretty sure you heard
the teacher say the words ‘important’ and ‘quiz’. But then that girl you met
over the weekend texted and while you have to respond, you want to sound cool and interested, but not too interested,
I mean you’re not desperate. And then a breeze blows through the window
and whoa, what is that smell? Has that girl always been in this class? She’s got pretty hair.
Man, I like a girl that smells good! Wait, do I smell good? Did I put on deodorant today?
Am I sweating? Sweating is weird.
It’s like your body’s crying smelly tears. (Laughter) And then the bell rings
and you have missed all of class and you definitely have absolutely no idea
what’s important and what’s on the quiz. The ability to turn
your attention to the class, to focus on something that frankly
might not be that interesting – like algebra – it’s a skill, and it requires practice. Mindfulness is how we get there. I find it funny when people tell me that they don’t need
to practice mindfulness, “Oh, I got this!” Really that is so strange
because I’m pretty sure Kobe Bryant already knows
how to play basketball, but he’s still practicing. He also practices mindfulness. Mindfulness isn’t just about
the ability to focus and pay attention, it’s also able to feel emotions like pain,
anger, frustration, anxiety, and fear and not react to them. Mindfulness gives us space
between our emotions and our responses, so that we can actually think first. Sometimes we forget
that our emotions are ever-changing, that joy and pain come and go
like ocean waves. Mindfulness allows us to surf,
rather than drown. And sometimes we forget
that we’re not the only ones feeling pain. Look around the room,
look at the person next to you, in front of you, behind you. They have all experienced pain. Every one of you
have all experienced pain. Pain is inevitable. Suffering? Well, that’s a choice. We may not be able to choose
all the uncontrolled circumstances that life presents with us any more
than we can choose the weather, right? But we can choose not to be victims
to our circumstances, because we can choose our reactions. Pain and anger, well,
they’re just not good excuses because they’re a part
of every human experience. If we respond to anger with anger,
we only make the situation worse. The harsh truth is that it doesn’t matter how righteous and justifiable
your emotions may be, it is irrelevant, because you’ll be judged
based on your reactions and not your reasons. Mindfulness allows us
to be reflective and not reactive. It’s not about running from our emotions
or not feeling our emotions, it’s allowing us to not be
overwhelmed by our emotions. It’s not about controlling
our thoughts and emotions, but rather not having our thoughts
and emotions control us. I have two teenagers. I teach teenagers and I was once,
900 years ago, a teenager myself. The struggle to deal with your emotions
is real and overwhelming. The part of the teenage brain
that regulates emotions, that hasn’t fully yet developed. But the part that feels emotions, that’s the size of a full grown adult. So something small can really easily
turn into something big. You’re walking in the hallway
and you see your friend, they look right at you, and you’re like,
“Hey, what’s up?”, and they ignore you like a Casper. So you walk into your next class,
and you spend the entire time trying to figure out
why this person hates you now. You’ve texted all of your other friends,
and nobody’s responded, you’ve replayed the last
three conversations you had with them in your head, and you still have no idea
what went wrong. So you decided that, well,
you hate them too, now, I mean, who are they to ignore you, right? Or you decided that, well,
gosh, they ignored you and nobody’s responded
to any of your text messages, and man, this must mean that actually
nobody likes you and really, you don’t have any friends,
and no one’s ever going to love you, and you’re definitely going
to die alone with a hundred cats. (Laughter) Obviously. Right? Clearly. Look this right here, this is called
taking a left turn down crazy lane. And we are all guilty of it. Mindfulness allows us to stop at the intersection
of reality and crazy lane; choose which path we want to go down. With all of the no needs
and benefits of mindfulness practice, I ask you again, why are we not
teaching it to you? Well, part of that
is because for a long time, mindfulness practice has been a privilege offered in well funded schools or
through expensive individual instruction. CEOs, celebrities, world famous athletes,
they flock to the trainings, paying as much as 10,000 dollars
to learn the secrets of success. It’s important
that we have mindful leaders, but we are missing great thinkers,
innovators, and doers, those who can’t afford to pay
for the skills required to succeed. Do we really think
all the best and brightest happen to be born with money? And what about those born in poverty,
I mean poverty is traumatic. We’re born into generational poverty,
whose parents and grandparents, aunts, uncles, sisters, and brothers,
all live in poverty. They’re surrounded
by the trauma of poverty and stress to contagious disease. It doesn’t just affect the adults,
it affects everyone living in the home. We know that poverty is traumatic,
we know that trauma changes the brain and so without practices like mindfulness,
gifted children are left behind. I believe that mindfulness practice
should be offered in every school, in every county,
in every district, in every state. It should not be about whether or not– (Applause) Thank you. It shouldn’t be about whether or not
your parents can afford the instruction or they can afford to move you
to the right ZIP code in the right school district. I believe that mindfulness practice
can reverse generational poverty, and we can move kids up and out. I had a fourth grade student
who grew up in generational poverty, his parents were in and out
of prison, drug use, he was considered a trouble maker,
academically behind, he even had to repeat a grade. He would get so frustrated,
he would throw his desk across the room, run out of the classroom building,
out of the school, and all the way down the street
multiple times a week. Now, two years later,
he practices mindfulness every day. He has no more classroom
or behavioral issues, and he’s in the gifted
and talented programme. He would tell you that it wasn’t until someone taught him
how to deal with his emotions, that someone taught him
mindfulness practice, that he was able to change his whole life. We know one of the number one predictors
for a student dropping out of high school is behavioral issues. We know that if you drop out, you’re
four times more likely to live in poverty. So we create these very specific
rules and consequences, but do we really think
little Timmy doesn’t know he shouldn’t poke little Tommy in the eye? Or does he not know how to stop himself? Has he never learned
how to manage his emotions? And for some, those emotions
can become so overwhelming they can feel permanent. Suicide is the third leading cause
of death in children ages 10-24. 4,800 succeed in taking
their own lives every year and 157,000 are treated for
self inflicted injuries, just in the US. In a study looking at 320 schools,
students ages 13-17, they found that nearly half,
49.5% met the criteria for suffering from at least
one mental health issue: anxiety, depression,
ADHD, eating disorders. We know that schools are the number one provider
for support for students, we know you’re struggling,
we know that mindfulness works, so I ask you again, why aren’t we teaching it to you? It’s with this in mind
that I conducted a research study with the University of Colorado in Denver
on the impacts of mindfulness instruction on fourth grade students
in a low income school here in Denver. We looked at the teachers’ perception of the students’ ability
to regulate their emotions, engage in pro-social behaviour,
and academic achievement. Those students who went
through mindfulness practice scored 250% higher
on emotional regulation, 600% higher on pro-social behaviour,
and 550% higher on academic achievement than those who did not go
through the class. We then asked the students, well,
what do you think of mindfulness class? 100% anonymously self reported
that they enjoyed the class, they benefited from the practice,
they will continue to do it, and they believe all
other children should learn it. They saw the greatest improvements
in their ability to calm down, focus, and avoid fights, as well as
feeling happier at school and at home. The teacher rated the class
a 10 out of 10 and said that she believed
mindfulness instruction actually led to an increase in teaching time
between 11 and 20 minutes. Mindfulness practices are exercises designed to help you become
a more mindful human being, one who can focus and pay attention
and miss a distraction, one who can feel intense emotions, and rather than react,
reflect and respond. Mindful listening? Man, that’s going to be important to every relationship
you ever have, for your entire life. Mindful eating? That’s going to determine
your physical and mental health, and mindful breathing allows you
to find calm and focus, peace in a chaos. These practices ultimately lead to compassion, generosity,
kindness, altruism. We need the world to be more mindful,
we need you to be more mindful. First, you have to decide
that you want to be the change that you want to see in the world
and then go about being it. Throughout this talk, I’ve asked you
why you aren’t being taught mindfulness. I will end with asking you to take
personal responsibility for your life. If you believe, as I do, as many,
many, many others do, that the path to your success,
the path to a better world, lies in the practice of mindfulness,
then ask your teachers and administrators to bring in experts to give you the skills
that you need to have to succeed. You need to take ownership
over your future. Change will happen;
by choice, not by chance. We will change the world,
one mind at a time. And it starts with yours. Thank you. (Applause)

100 thoughts on “Why Aren’t We Teaching You Mindfulness | AnneMarie Rossi | [email protected]

  1. Of course teachers could really benefit from mindfulness too….and policy makers…etc. Being mindful is like waking up. The lack of mindfulness teaching in school comes from policy makers who are still sleepwalking.

  2. Minute 11:20 … "so I ask yo again, why aren't we teaching it (mindfulness) to you?" She asked it several times but I din't get the answer??? So what is the answer???

  3. it's strange how countries like India have been fucked up by western lifestyle, whereas the western countries are benefiting from the ancient Indian practices.

  4. In June 2016, I launched an online petition, with the hope of seeing the Mindfulness program removed from my child's public elementary school. With the petition, I also hope to see the Mindfulness program, MindUP program, etc. removed from all other applicable Canadian public schools. Please check out the petition here https://www.change.org/p/minister-of-education-please-remove-the-mindfulness-program-from-canadian-public-schools

  5. Mind Up is an excellent resource for Mindfulness practices. Miss a full curriculum with lesson ideas and cross curricular connections. It's from the Goldie Hawn Foundation

  6. The Basics of Buddhist Meditation
    Dr. C. George Boeree
    Buddhism began by encouraging its practitioners to engage in smrti (sati) or mindfulness, that is, developing a full consciousness of all about you and within you — whether seated in a special posture, or simply going about one’s life. This is the kind of meditation that Buddha himself engaged in under the bodhi tree, and is referred to in the seventh step of the eightfold path.

  7. A reason for the non-acceptance of mindfulness is that it's not explained well.

    Perhaps if it can be explained simply wiuthout all of the cloudy new age metaphors, it would be accepted!!

    In other words mindfulness does not need more studies, it needs Occam's Razor!

    An elaboration of this argument is below, along with linked references.

    What Mindfulness Research Neglects

    Mindfulness is defined as non-judgmental or choice-less awareness. Choices in turn may be divided into non-perseverative choices (what to have for breakfast, what route to take to go home, or choices with no dilemmas) and perseverative choices (worries, distractions, and rumination, or mental dilemmas wherein every alternative is bad). All meditative procedures, including mindfulness, avoid both.

    The consistent avoidance of perseverative choice alone represents resting protocols, wherein the neuro-muscular activity is sharply reduced. In other words, when we want to be relaxed we isolate ourselves from distractive and worrisome events and thoughts. These states in turn correlate with increased levels of endogenous opioids or ‘endorphins’ in the brain. The benefits of this are manifest, as the sustained increase of endogenous opioids down regulates opioid receptors, and thus inhibits the salience or reward value of other substances (food, alcohol, drugs) that otherwise increase opioid levels, and therefore reduces cravings, as well as mitigating our sensitivity to pain. Profound relaxation also inhibits muscular tension and its concomitant discomfort. In this way, relaxation causes pleasure, enhances self-control, counteracts and inhibits stress, reduces pain, and provides for a feeling of satisfaction and equanimity that is the hallmark of the so-called meditative state.

    It may be deduced therefore that meditative states are primarily resting states, and that meditative procedures over-prescribe the cognitive operations that may be altered to provide its salutary benefits (that is, you just need to avoid perseverative choices, not all choices), and that meditation as a concept must be redefined.

    Finally, the objective measurement of neuro-muscular activity and its neuro-chemical correlates (long established in the academic literature on resting states) is in general ignored by the academic literature on mindfulness, which is primarily based upon self-reports and neurological measures (fMRI) that cannot account for these facts. The problem with mindfulness research is therefore not theoretical, but empirical, and until it clearly accounts for all relevant observables for brain and body, the concept will never be fully explained.

    More of this argument, including references, below including a link to the first study (published this year) that has discovered the presence of opioid activity due to mindfulness practice, as well as the 1988 Holmes paper which provided the most extensive argument to date that meditation was rest.

    http://www.amjmed.com/article/S0002-9343(16)30302-3/abstract

    https://www.scribd.com/doc/284056765/The-Book-of-Rest-The-Odd-Psychology-of-Doing-Nothing

    https://www.scribd.com/document/291558160/Holmes-Meditation-and-Rest-The-American-Psychologist

  8. Having completed my Master's degree in Education : Emotional Education (Atlow Mill Centre for Emotional Education in the UK and University ) and having just completed additional training in Youth Mindfulness I am, having watched this TEDx, in the present moment, feeling even more optimistic and enthusiastic to implement this process of teaching Mindfulness to children as it truly meets my needs for purpose and meaning in life not to mention developing a more peaceful world.
    My engagment with Emotional Education and Mindfulness started with me recognising that I needed to take responsibility and do the work on myself first and for most.
    I'm so pleased I did as I am so much happier ad a result 🙂

  9. "why aren't we teaching it to you?" Why are you asking students why teachers aren't teaching them something? Shouldn't you be asking the teachers, school boards & college administrators?

  10. This is all a lie, none of these work. I find this extremely offensive to some people, this is a micro aggression in the third degree.

  11. Hi, could you give the reference to the study you mentionned that you did in the university of Denver Colorado? Thank you

  12. Powerful talk! I'll use this in my classes when I do mindfulness activities. There are many different practices that one can do, not only meditation, and students like variety. Here are some examples of projects that students have chosen – some of them self-created – that helped them become more mindful. (Scroll down to the bottom half of the entry for all the examples). https://martinschmidtinasia.wordpress.com/2016/05/26/teaching-for-self-transcendence-spiritual-practices-in-the-world-religions-classroom/

  13. This is super stressful to listen too instead of talking about how we aren't mindful and making the focus of how to be. I have to turn it off.

  14. This is all true but I find it ironic that someone who is lecturing about emotional regulation is speaking quite aggressively…

  15. All so self centered.
    " what can I do to help someone today? if I do good , I am humbly cooperating with the will of my loving maker. "
    what, ask yourself what is success?

  16. this is why i like this channel, it is like a gold mine . i find a video from last year or one that was uploaded less than an hour ago then i find out that this is what i wanted to know. i learn something new every day thanks to this channel 🙂

  17. if you want to achieve mindfulness read all of the comments …just kidding . read a few you might find someone who shares your opinion 🙂

  18. Perhaps they are not teaching mindfulness because mindfulness has no proper explanation.

    What Mindfulness Research Neglects

    Mindfulness is defined as non-judgmental or choice-less awareness. Choices in turn may be divided into non-perseverative choices (what to have for breakfast, what route to take to go home, or choices with no dilemmas) and perseverative choices (worries, distractions, and rumination, or mental dilemmas wherein every alternative is bad). All meditative procedures, including mindfulness, avoid both.

    The consistent avoidance of perseverative choice alone represents resting protocols, wherein the neuro-muscular activity is sharply reduced. In other words, when we want to be relaxed we isolate ourselves from distractive and worrisome events and thoughts. These states in turn correlate with increased levels of endogenous opioids or ‘endorphins’ in the brain. The benefits of this are manifest, as the sustained increase of endogenous opioids down regulates opioid receptors, and thus inhibits the salience or reward value of other substances (food, alcohol, drugs) that otherwise increase opioid levels, and therefore reduces cravings, as well as mitigating our sensitivity to pain. Profound relaxation also inhibits muscular tension and its concomitant discomfort. In this way, relaxation causes pleasure, enhances self-control, counteracts and inhibits stress, reduces pain, and provides for a feeling of satisfaction and equanimity that is the hallmark of the so-called meditative state.

    It may be deduced therefore that meditative states are primarily resting states, and that meditative procedures over-prescribe the cognitive operations that may be altered to provide its salutary benefits (that is, you just need to avoid perseverative choices, not all choices), and that meditation as a concept must be redefined.

    Finally, the objective measurement of neuro-muscular activity and its neuro-chemical correlates (long established in the academic literature on resting states) is in general ignored by the academic literature on mindfulness, which is primarily based upon self-reports and neurological measures (fMRI) that cannot account for these facts. The problem with mindfulness research is therefore not theoretical, but empirical, and until it clearly accounts for all relevant observables for brain and body, the concept will never be fully explained.

    More of this argument, including references, below including a link to the first study (published last year) that has discovered the presence of opioid activity due to mindfulness practice, as well as the 1988 Holmes paper which provided the most extensive argument to date that meditation was rest.

    http://www.amjmed.com/article/S0002-9343(16)30302-3/abstract

    https://www.scribd.com/doc/284056765/The-Book-of-Rest-The-Odd-Psychology-of-Doing-Nothing

    https://www.scribd.com/document/291558160/Holmes-Meditation-and-Rest-The-American-Psychologist

  19. I wonder then, why psychologists say that depression is caused by brain neuron defect. What I'm meaning is, it's physically broken by them but this talk is saying it can be cured a lot by psychological treatment. Well, then the depression shouldn't be chronic neuron damage, right?

  20. We probably don't teach it in schools, incase kids work out happiness and a joyous life has zilch to do with perpetual consumption, and that will never do in an economy that is grounded 70% on consumerism.

  21. She don't went to the point? Why the Jordans, Koby Bryants, Bill Gates, Steve Jobs of the world (the sucessful people) don't speak about the miracles of mindfulness?

  22. Dear Ann Marie, your advice is worth it's weight in gold. Beautiful advice for teenagers. Wish I had heard you 20 years ago. God Bless you.

  23. Thank you for your talk and your work. I am a high school English teacher doing research specifically on the connection between meditation/mindfulness and reading and writing. I've found some pieces by James Moffett, but I am struggling to find the kind of material I need. Any suggestions would be much appreciated. : )

  24. Thank you! one of the best Ted Talks on Mindfulness Meditation. I so appreciate you sharing. It's such a powerful practice.

  25. Mindfulness pisses me off. I get forced to do this crap at work and must peddle it with enthusiasm yet I'm seething inside because if I speak my opinion about it I know that those I vent my thoughts to about it won't be mindful and not offended.

  26. We watched this in science and my science teacher does mindfulness everyday and makes us write what we are great full for, and we are doing ten times better than we would if we didn't do mindfulness. I will forever be greatfull for what he has taught us.

  27. The opening study AnneMarie mentions was not conducted by Harvard (oops), nor does the study mention anything about focus or the practice of mindfulness.

  28. Wow this is excellent, such a powerful lady and so full of wisdom and knowledge. My husband and young son would both benifit immensely from this, they have problems managing their emotions. Of course, we could all benifit from this and would love to know more. Indeed children should be taught mindfulness at school so that they could improve not only as human beings but their overall grades! Love this!!! Thank you.

  29. Im starting to practice mindfullness with a couple of online courses and a book I borrowed from my uni.
    I have plenty of faith in this, because I already used the concept of "being present on the moment" to notice when what Im doing is productive/positive or a waste of time, like noticing the moments when I started using fb for too long without actually doing anything.

  30. A very young an inexperienced lady. She will eventually discover pain is really not always controllable . . .LOL This is one of the issues with having young people trying to teach us "life lessons>"

  31. So basically paying attention and living in the present 🤔 sounds like school to me they are subconsciously teaching that. but you mean like full clarity and alert consciousness almost . Iv experience that when I had a good teacher that I actually liked and made their class entertaining. But unlike other classes where the teacher mistreated there students or could care less I learned nothing. 🤔 why don't they teach the teachers so that the students get the positive thinking from them .But still I think you mean something else like what if a class is intentionally boring beyond belief and you want to teach students to use mindfulness to stay focused

  32. Hola desde BCS México wooooooooooooooo es maravilloso su trabajo, y afortunado es cualquier persona que sienta emociones depresivas, Sad and down sure wen, your public ending your exposition the curiosity move many people's for quest the true. And maybe winner the prime part of the breakbrain of !!!

  33. So powerful. I nearly cried. Mindfulness and Eckart Tolle have helped me so much, I can barely described how it has changed my life. The process was painful and I only managed it with help but: To leave my addictions behind me and become present and mindful is the greatest relief and freedom I have ever experienced.

  34. AnneMarie – In a reply below, you said, 'For centuries it has been understood that the practice is actually quite difficult and the support of a sangha and teacher are necessary.' This is actually not true. The difficulty lies primarily in the self-discipline of the practitioner. This is exaggerated in the west where we promote instant gratification for almost everything. There are two components of mindfulness practice that contribute to the lack of self-discipline. The first is that, in the beginning, there is very little feedback. That is, you don't know if you're doing it right because you're not getting any immediate feedback from your brain or your other senses. In fact you're brain is going to try to convince you that this is a waste of time. It's not. And most people will not notice the difference for quite a while. I like to compare the learning of mindfulness to learning to play the piano. The more you practice, the faster you learn. But even if you practice all day long, it's going to take time before you see any real results. Now with regard to feedback, you can tell exactly how far you've come when it comes to playing piano. Why? Because we already know what it means to be a great piano player – hearing allows us to have a shared experience. Now imagine for a moment a world in which there was no shared piano music and piano players can only play and experience their own piano playing. Only you know what you are doing on your piano, but you don't know if it's right or wrong, good or bad. As you can see, the first problem is that you don't know the difference between making music and making noise. But there are books that explain the basics to you and other piano players who cannot listen to you play, but can ask you what you are doing to tell you whether you're doing it right or not. And some of these piano players tell you that if you keep learning and keep practicing that someday you will achieve something amazing. This is what mindfulness is. Others can do it, there are many ways to learn it, but you have to experience it for yourself. Which brings us to the second component – comprehension. A bad teacher is worse than no teacher at all. And the same is true for sanghas, aka communities. I can tell you from personal experience that neither is necessary. While good teachers do exist, how are you going to tell the difference if you don't what mindfulness is? You're basically taking someone's word for it. Please don't misunderstand me. I think anyone will be better prepared to choose a teacher AFTER they have an idea of what mindfulness is. That might sound illogical but I truly believe newcomers will be better off doing it this way. You don't really need a teacher to get started. That means finding a good book written by a westerner who can explain it in language you already understand. Then spend six months to a year of daily practice. I had a life-changing experience in 6 months using Living The Mindful Life by Charles Tart as my primer. There's also The Science of Enlightenment or the Mind Illuminated, neither of which I have yet read, but both look promising. What everyone is going to discover is that there is an author, a technique, a method of practice that will resonate with you personally. Don't give up. When I began there wasn't even any consensus that it was real. Today, well … as you can see, it's quite different. Check out Rob Nairn. He gets it. I have 6 of his videos in my playlist and this one. Well done, AnneMarie.

  35. Thoughts and the gaps between them are rocks with edges and cliffs from which they fall. Mindfulness smooths out those edges.

  36. I am practising mindfulness nowadays , very useful indeed , I reget I didn't get to know this decades ago which would have made my life much better and colourful… Better late than never.. Fantastic presentation… She looks so young and beautiful for her age having teenage kids , I think it is because of living her life mindfully..

  37. What's the point of the speech if you don't actually say what people can do today to make their lives more mindful? It's like saying "Oh, you need to earn money to live in a good house, not in a shelter". Im so angry trying to find some information loosing my time on even writing this comment.

  38. This was amazing! So many great points. I left my teaching job to bring mindfulness to many kids, not just my class for the year. My hope is that I can get this message to as many as possible!!

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