West Virginia teachers strike explained | IN 60 SECONDS


In early March, West Virginia’s teachers
ended a nine-day strike after the legislature adopted a 5% boost in
teacher pay. Missing from the headlines was much attention to how West Virginia
got here: West Virginia added staff while losing
students. Over more than two decades, West Virginia student enrollment fell by 12%,
but non-teaching staff grew by 10%! In fact, between 1992 and 2014, real per-pupil spending rose 39%, but real teacher pay actually fell three percent! Consider
this: A West Virginia teacher would today earn more than $63,000 a
year if teacher pay had simply kept pace with per-pupil spending. Salaries are
only part of the story, of course. West Virginia ranks in the top five
nationally in terms of retirement costs. That comes at the expense of take-home
pay. Look, take home pay for West Virginia’s teachers is pretty dismal, and
this 5% bump certainly helps. But this settlement is a costly patch that didn’t
address a frustrating status quo. What do you think should be done about teacher pay? Let us know in your comments. Also, let us know what other topics you’d like
our scholars to cover in 60 seconds, and be sure to like and subscribe for more
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6 thoughts on “West Virginia teachers strike explained | IN 60 SECONDS”

  1. So tired of hearing how teachers don't get paid enough when they make close to double what I make and they don't even work a few months out of the year plus they get government benefits.

  2. Teachers here make similar pay to our average yearly employment overall. That's not the whole issue. What the issue truly is here is how much our state level "education officials" make and how bloated that system is. Our state superintendent makes more than our governor does. We need to reduce the number of state and board office employees AND the fees for our "coaches" and then worry about getting our teachers funded. School is not about sports…it's about learning to read, write, and do math. We also don't need that many overseers (and it increases yearly) when our student base is decreasing yearly. It's just a pathetic misuse of funding.

  3. I’m a teacher in Texas. My gross pay is 46k & my husband the same. I could go work for a larger district and increase my pay at least 4K. I knew choosing this profession would mean a career that wouldn’t result in being wealthy. I have all my needs met. Before I had kids I would work in the summer for extra spending money. I’ve seen that a lot of costs go towards those non teaching administrative staff that often are paid more. Our small district has created 1-2 new administrative positions every year for the last 5 years. Meanwhile my special ed department at my school is understaffed to the point we are actually breaking the law by not serving students according to their IEP.

  4. why are teachers pensions invested in lockheed martin bombs and weapons?
    why are teachers pensions invested in lockheed martin bombs and weapons?
    why are teachers pensions invested in lockheed martin bombs and weapons?
    why are teachers pensions invested in lockheed martin bombs and weapons?
    why are teachers pensions invested in lockheed martin bombs and weapons?
    why are teachers pensions invested in lockheed martin bombs and weapons?
    why are teachers pensions invested in lockheed martin bombs and weapons?why are teachers pensions invested in lockheed martin bombs and weapons?why are teachers pensions invested in lockheed martin bombs and weapons?why are teachers pensions invested in lockheed martin bombs and weapons?

  5. I propose an bill that all congressmen and senator have to speak to 10 residents that represent from the lowest income to Highest. That they have town hall meeting at least twice a year. My job mandate meeting and you don’t show up then it effects your salary. It should effect then in the pockets because that is all they care about.

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