The difference between psychology and social work



Psychology evolved from the disciplines of
physiology and philosophy. It developed from a focus on understanding how the mind works
and how sensations experienced become transported into conscious awareness. The Social Work profession was born out of
church and charity work hundreds of years ago. The first social work school was established
in New Zealand in 1949, and since then it has become a profession with a strong social
justice focus. Psychology focuses on understanding human
behaviour and explaining it through scientific principles. Behaviour occurs in so many contexts,
and psychology works at teasing out all the separate internal and external factors that
influence behaviour. Social work facilitates social wellbeing for
all people. We support people to achieve their own social goals, like decent housing, employment,
positive relationships and aging well. Now most people can achieve these goals on their
own, but some face additional hurdles like mental and physical impairment or illness,
a lack of access to resources, discrimination and prejudice, and sometimes its just bad luck, and that's
where we come in. To be a psychologist, you need membership
of a professional body and postgraduate training. An undergraduate degree in psychology provides
a foundation for this advanced training. To become a social worker, you need to complete
a recognised Bachelor of Social Work programme like ours. Or, if you already have a bachelor
degree in a related discipline, you may be able to enter directly into a masters programme.
Either way, check that your programme of choice is recognised by the Social Worker's Registration
Board. Registration is increasingly required and likely to become mandatory in the near
future. A psychology degree offers a range of transferable
skills for any role working with people or developing systems used by people. These skills
include critical thinking, research, and analytical and synthesis skills to understand and explain
behaviour in personal, social and organisational contexts using a multi-perspective approach.
Successful psychology graduates can work in human resources, social services or marketing.
Psychology can also enhance a career in other fields such as nursing or teaching. If you
want to work as a psychologist, you will need to complete relevant post graduate study after
an under graduate degree. Once qualified, you could work in the fields of clinical,
criminal justice, educational, organisational, or health psychology.
Across these fields a common practice is developing interventions to manage behaviour. Qualified social workers can work in both
government and non-government organisations. Government organisations include child youth
and family, corrections and district health boards. Non-government organisations include
iwi maori or pasifika social services, services for refugees and migrants, religious based
organisations and community based groups like family starts, women's refuge and disabilty
support services.

12 thoughts on “The difference between psychology and social work”

  1. Wow I swear nearly every decent job requires post-grad study these days……🙄 Which means more debt.

  2. so i am going to do both for the university i am attending i can do a bachelors in social work and a master degree in psychology because quite frankly it is quite difficult to get a job with just a bachelors with a psychology degree and i know for certain that i want to have a job while im attending grad school. but i want to make sure social work can somewhat correspond with psychology.

  3. Iits strange that when the women who talks about psychology speaks, the sound is clipped; and seems muffled and altered somehow. Did anyone else notice this? Or maybe it's just that one in the pink has a thicker accent that's more difficult for me to understand…

  4. Does a social worker is authorized to provide psychotherapies in clinical settings?
    Please make a video of the roles of a mental health social worker and what a social worker should do and should not do professionally.

  5. This is a great breakdown— I find myself answering this question often on my social work channel ✨👍🏼

  6. Thank you so much for making this! It gets straight to the point and touches all of the major questions I had about the differences between these two fields.

  7. Thank you for this video. It is really well made and extremely helpful in elucidating the differences between these two field of study. The music is cool, too!

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