Resume vs Curriculum Vitae vs Biodata | Differences between a Resume, CV and Biodata – ANIMATED


Often times, someone may have asked for your
“Curriculum Vitae” or “CV” when you were expecting them to ask for your “Resume”. Or maybe someone asked you for your “Biodata”. You may have an idea of what a resume is,
but what exactly is a Curriculum Vitae or a Biodata? Why are they being used instead of the word
“Resume”? In what scenarios, should you use the words
“Resume”, “Curriculum Vitae” or “CV” and “Biodata”? Let’s find out. Let’s start with a “Resume” “Resume” is a French word, which means
“Summary”. It is a document that summarizes the following
details about you: • Objective Statement
• Education • Skills
• Work Experience • Achievements
• Relevant professional associations or volunteer work Some of these details may or may not be applicable
to you, depending upon whether you are an experienced professional or a fresher. You bundle these details in a two-page document
called the “Resume”. Only if you have a lot of experience and see
it tough to squeeze in all this information in just a couple of pages, then you may add
one more page to your resume and supply additional information on it. You may then present these details to a prospective
employer for consideration. This summary is then reviewed and based on
the information provided, a decision is made whether you are a good fit for the job role. If you are, then your summary is “Shortlisted”
and you may be invited for a formal interview. It is a general practice to list professional
experience on a resume in reverse-chronological order, starting with the current or the most
recent job. If you are a recent graduate with little or
no professional history, you would start with your education and then list any relevant
internships. Let’s look at a “Curriculum Vitae” “Curriculum Vitae” is a Latin word, which
means “course of life”. It is also popularly known as “CV”. In other words, “CV” is just an abbreviation
for “Curriculum Vitae”. It is a detailed document that contains the
following details about you: • Education
• Skills • Work Experience
• Achievements • Awards
• Special Honors • Certifications
• Scholarships • Research projects
• Publications • Professional references
• Hobbies & Interests A CV is generally written in a chronological
order and starts with your educational experience. As more details are required in it, a typical
CV is at least three pages in length and can go up to ten pages. Once you have arranged all these details in
an order, you may then present them to a prospective employer for consideration. The CV is then reviewed and based on the information
provided, a decision is made whether you are a good fit for the job role. If you are, then your CV is “Shortlisted”
and you may be invited for a formal interview. Let’s look at a “Biodata” Biodata is an abbreviation for “Biographical
Data”. It is a detailed document that includes relevant
factual information about you. This can include lot of personal information
along with professional information and so, will include details such as: • Date of birth
• Gender • Race
• Religion • Nationality
• Photograph • Marital status
• Residence • Height
• Complexion • Father’s name
• Family Information • Educational background
• Work Experience • Skills
• Hobbies and Interests A biodata typically begins with personal information
and is typically one to three pages long. In some countries, it is used to apply for
employment and in some other countries such as India, it is used as a marriage biodata
to present to a prospective marriage partner. As seen earlier, if your biodata matches the
requirements of the prospective employer, then you may be called for a formal interview. Now that we have an introduction to what a
Summary, CV and a Biodata really are, let us look at the actual differences. Here we have the differences between resume,
CV and biodata in a table or format. Let’s take a look at the features one by one. So, when it comes to professional details,
a resume needs to provide a concise summary. A CV needs a brief about the details but typically
more details than a resume will be included. In a bio-data the professional details are
needed as a concise summary or as requested. When the personal details are concerned in
a resume, you need to include only very minimal personal details and a resume focuses very
less on them. A CV needs very minimal personal details and
it focuses very less on them. A bio-data needs a lot of personal details
and focuses heavily on them. When talking about how long the document should
be, a resume is ideally one to two pages long. In contrast, a CV is usually three to ten
pages long, whereas a bio-data is typically one to three pages long. When talking about customization, a resume
can be customized so that you can highlight your skills that intersect with the job requirement. When talking about a CV it does not change
with the job and only needs to be updated to include the latest job info. For a bio-data it remains the same for the
most part and only needs to be updated to include the latest job info. A resume is suitable for applying for many
types of corporate roles and used in many countries across the globe. A CV is widely used in applying for academic
roles in some countries it can be specifically asked for interchangeably with a resume. A bio-data is suitable for applying for jobs
in some cases and even for seeking matrimonial alliance in some countries such as India. When discussing about geography, a resume
is widely used across many countries such as USA, Canada, etc. When talking about a CV, it is used in some
countries or upon demand depending upon the requirement to refine the candidate selection. Examples of countries that use CV are United
Kingdom, Europe, New Zealand, India etc. And lastly, a bio-data is used in some South
Asian countries such as India Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, etc. Hope these sets of similarities and differences
have enlightened you on the topics discussed and gave you a much better idea and eliminated
any confusion you may have had. If a prospective employer asks you for a CV
or a biodata and if you want to ensure that you send them the documentation they are asking
for, try calling them or send them an email asking to confirm if they are referring to
a standard two page resume or a full-blown CV or a biodata and then proceed according
to the response you receive and that would help eliminate any confusion you may have. That’s all for now, see you in the next
video.

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