Phrasal Verbs for TRAVEL: “drop off”, “get in”, “check out”…


Hello. My name is Emma, and in today’s video
I’m going to talk about something I love, and that is travel. So, if you like travelling
too, if you’re planning on going on a vacation, or if you know somebody who’s travelling,
this video will be very, very helpful to you. In this video I’m going to teach you some
very important verbs. They’re all phrasal verbs, and I’ll explain what a phrasal verb
is in a moment. So, these are all verbs that we use when we’re talking
about travel. Okay. So, to get started, I wanted to tell
you a little bit about phrasal verbs. What is a phrasal verb? One of the difficulties
students have with English are verbs where you have a verb and a preposition. So, when you see
a verb and a preposition together, that’s a phrasal verb. Now, you might be thinking:
“What’s a preposition?” Good question. I’m going to give you an example. We have here
four words, each of these is a phrasal verb. They all have the verb “get”: “get in”, “get
up”, “get on”, “get over”, and there’s many more, “get away”. There’s tons of them. Each
of these actually can have multiple meanings, too. So, one of the most difficult parts about
English is learning phrasal verbs, because this, the blue part is the preposition, it
can change the meaning of the verb. Okay? So, prepositions are words like: “on”, “off”,
“up”, “down”, “toward”, “over”, “away”, these types of words are prepositions. So, you’ll
notice with phrasal verbs, they’re very, very common in conversation. They’re… You can
write them down, too, but in general, when people talk they often use phrasal verbs. Okay?
So, they’re very, very important, especially when you’re talking about going on a
trip with your friends or family. So let’s look at some of the common phrasal
verbs we use when we’re talking about trips. The first verb I want to teach you: “Drop
off”. Okay? So: “drop” is the verb, “off” is the preposition, together: “drop off”
is a phrasal verb. What does this mean: “drop off”? When you “drop someone off” it means
you’re taking them to a place and then you leave them there. So, for example, maybe your
friend needs to go to the airport, so you drive them to the airport and you drop them
off at the airport. This means you take them there and you leave them in that place. Okay?
So they don’t come home with you; they stay there. So, for example, I have a friend named
Frank, and when Frank goes travelling: “We drop Frank off at the airport.” So, we drive
Frank to the airport, he has all his luggage, his suitcases, and then we say to Frank: “Goodbye,
Frank, you know, have a nice trip.” We drop Frank off at the airport. You can also use
“drop off” in a lot of other situations. For example, when you were a child maybe your
parents, your mom or your dad, or maybe your grandparents dropped you off at school. This
means that they took you to school, and then once you got to school, they would say goodbye
to you and they would leave. So: “drop off” means you take someone to a place, and then
you leave them there. You’ll also notice… So, I have here the verb and the preposition.
“Frank” is a name of a person and it’s in the middle of “drop” and “off”. Okay? So,
these two are not together. We drop somebody off at the airport. Okay? So, sometimes with
phrasal verbs… For some phrasal verbs you actually separate them, and you can put the
names of somebody between them; for other ones you can’t do that. For this one: “drop
off”, you put the name between the two… Between the verb and
the preposition. So, now let’s look at another example of a
common phrasal verb. “See off”. Okay? So, again, we have “off” in both of these. “See
off” is when… It’s similar to “drop off”, but it’s a little bit different. Sometimes
your family or your friends are going away for a long time, maybe they’re going on
a vacation or a trip, so you want to “see them off”. It means you want to say goodbye to them
at the airport, at the train station, maybe at their house. So, it’s that goodbye you
say before somebody goes off on a vacation. Okay? So, for example: “We see Frank off.”
Frank is going to Australia, so we go to the airport because we want to say goodbye to
Frank, so: “We see Frank off” is another way to say: “We say goodbye to Frank when he goes
on his trip.” All right, so now let’s look at… Oh, and again, similar to “drop off”,
notice where “Frank” is. “We see Frank off.”, “Frank” is between the verb and the
preposition. Okay? So, we see somebody off. “We see our mother off.”, “We see our
father off.”, “We see our friend off.” So, this is the way you
use this phrasal verb. Now, let’s look at some other phrasal
verbs that have to do with travel. Okay, so our next phrasal verb is very important
when we’re talking about the airport. Okay? So, if you’ve ever been on an airplane, you
should know this word: “take off”. So, the meaning of “take off” is this is when the
airplane leaves the airport and flies away. Okay? So, if this is the airplane, it takes
off. Okay? It’s the opposite of “lands”. So: “takes off” means the airplane goes up into the
sky. So, an example of this is very simple: “The plane takes off.” Okay? “The plane takes
off at 7 o’clock.” Again, “takes” and “off” are together, so there’s
nothing separating them. All right, what’s another important phrasal
verb? We also have: “Get in”. So, this also has to do with the airplane. This is when the
plane arrives at the airport. “…on an airport” , “plane arrives”, sorry. The plane arrives
at an airport. Okay? So, for example: “Frank’s plane gets in at 9 pm.” We can also
use this for a person. Okay? When you say: “Frank gets in at 9 pm”, it pretty much means arrives. So: “Frank gets in at
9 pm.”, “Frank’s airplane gets in at 9 pm.” We can also use this for train: “Frank’s train gets in at 9 pm.” So, it means arrives. Okay? And we use it
a lot when we talk about transportation, like planes and trains. Okay. The next one: “Check in”. “Check in” and “Check
out”. These are very important for when you stay at a hotel or a hostile. Okay? So, when
you check in, this means you register at the hotel. So, for example, I want to stay at a
hotel, I want to sleep at the hotel, I go to the hotel and there’s somebody at the front
desk, and what do I say to them? I say: “I would like to check in.” “Frank checks
in.”, “Frank checks in to the hotel.” So, this means Frank goes into the hotel, and he
tells them: “I’m here. I want a bed. I check in.” Now, the opposite of this is “Check out”.
This is when you leave the hotel, and you pay them the money for your stay there. So,
maybe you go to the hotel for five days, when you leave the hotel and you pay the money
for those five days, that’s when you check out. So, we can say: “Frank checks out.” Now,
let’s look at a couple more phrasal verbs. Okay, so our next phrasal verb is: “set out”.
Okay? “Set out”. So, what does it mean? When you set out it means you start… So, key word
here is “start”. A journey, or you sometimes start a road trip. So, it’s the beginning of
usually a journey or a trip. So, for example, imagine Frank, he’s at the hotel and he wants
to go on an adventure, he wants to explore. Maybe he’s… I said he was in Australia,
maybe he’s in Sydney, Australia, and he wants to explore Sydney, so we can say: “Frank set
out early to explore.” This means that Frank starts his journey early. Okay? If you’ve
ever gone on a road trip where you drove your car somewhere very far, you know, maybe you
drove your car for three days to go somewhere, you can say: “Every day we set out early” or
“we set out late”. So this means we began our trip early or we began our trip late.
So, “set out” means to start a journey. Okay, our last one, very important: “pick
up”. Okay, there’s many different meanings of the word “pick up”. You can pick up the
phone, you can pick something up with your hand. In this case it’s a little bit different
when we’re talking about travel. When we’re talking about “pick up” here, we’re talking
about where you get someone from a place, and then you take them to another place. So,
for example, when Frank comes home, I will pick Frank up from the airport and take Frank
home. Okay? So it’s where you… Usually it’s you’re in a car, not always, but usually you
pick somebody up with your car, and you take them somewhere else. So, for example: “Michelle
picks Frank up in her car.” So, maybe at the airport, she drives to the airport, Frank’s
there from his long trip in Australia, and she picks him up. Not literally, she doesn’t
lift him up. No. With her car, she takes him from the airport to his house.
Okay. So, I’d like you to come visit
our website at www.engvid.com, and there, you can actually do a quiz to practice all the
words you learned today and the grammar in these words. So, I hope you check that out.
And until next time, take care.

100 thoughts on “Phrasal Verbs for TRAVEL: “drop off”, “get in”, “check out”…”

  1. Hi there, I became addicted to your videos, I like the way you speak and explain, you're such a beautiful and superb woman I really love you 😍😍😍 I wish you all the best 💐🌺

  2. Hi Emma I have a question, you've said " I hope you check that out ", what does it mean?, I don't understand the context 🤔

  3. You speak plainly. Even though I'm fluent in English since many years, I like to hear your pleasant voice. I was actually analyzing you. You're a pretty teacher. Keep it up! No pun intended. 🙂

  4. Good job. There have been some grammatical mistakes though. Of these, you, for example, are using the third singular person verb in the simple present without adding the morpheme 's':
    Frank set out tomorrow early !
    I expected it to be :
    Farnk sets out tomorrow early.
    Keep up the hard work.

  5. Hi so tell children they are about to reading Chinese emperor who commanded by information to Internet speed on discussion with meaning that if you have any questions please contact country style and people things how much better course reading application score see you tomorrow welcome

  6. We drop off Frank to tje airport.
    We see off them.
    The plane takes off at 11pm.
    The plane gets in 8am.
    We set out a trip.
    We check in.
    We check out

  7. Ofcouse i understand very well, and we have nothing to say accept we'll express our thanks to you, who was teaching us and also our thanks to some others whom they helped you to presented this ability, thank you very much.

  8. Last week I went to pick up my friend at the airport. The plane got in on time, so he could check in quickly and we set out to go sightseeing early. Next day, it was time for him to go home, I dropped him off at the airport, saw him off after checking out and then plane took off.

  9. You're the best teacher all over the YouTube. You're amazing. Thanks to you for providing us such a great lessons with questions to practice.Please accept our heartfelt gratitude .

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