How To Play A Guitar Solo – Beginner Guitar Lesson



hey I made savage and in this video I'm going to show you how to play a solo on the guitar now it doesn't matter if you've never played guitar before or if you think that playing lead guitar is just too hard I'm going to show you the very basics that you need to know to play a really cool solo along to a jam track and prove to yourself that you can play the guitar I'm going to be using an electric during this lesson but it doesn't matter if you have an electric or acoustic either one will work we're going to be covering things pretty quickly throughout this lesson so if you need some more detailed lessons on picking scales or how to read tab things like that you're going to want to check out the guitar toolbox you can get free access to it at guitar lessons comm slash toolbox first off we need to go over some basic picking technique tips and I'm going to be using a flat pick for this lesson but you don't have to use a pick at all you can use your thumb or your finger it's really up to you if you are using a pick though to stick the pick out in front of you like that put your thumb on it perpendicular to it and then just come down on it with your index fingers naturally and relax as you can once you got that grip that's going to be your basic grip for picking just come to your guitar pick any string put the downstroke I try not to tense up and don't just lock your wrists and pick from your elbow like they're just stay relaxed those are some basic picking tips that you're gonna want to keep in mind as you move to this lesson now let's move on to the fretting hand just a couple of quick technique tips for this put your hand out in front of you kind of like you're holding a baseball really relaxed bring it to the neck of the guitar and you can put one finger on any fret on the guitar but arms with my first finger on the twelfth fret of the third string or it's usually the fret with two dots on it on the fret board just press that down stay really relaxed on the very tip of your finger right behind the fret that's some basic fretting hand technique to remember for the solo in this lesson we're going to be using a scale called the blues skill don't worry too much about that right now you can learn the scale shape later for now just focus all kind of imitating what I do as we learn this solo now I need to talk a little bit about timing and counting a piece of sheet music when you look at it is divided up into measures by vertical lines and each measure has a set number of beats or counts in it in the case of our example or the jam track we're going to be playing along to each measure has four beats in it so really the only thing you need to concern yourself with right now is being able to count along to the music in groups of four four beats per measure one two three four one two three four let me pull the jam track you'll be paying along too and show you what I mean we'll come on okay so here's the groove one two three four one two three four one three four you have to be able to fill that group how long as the next little piece of information we need to cover is the chord progression you're going to be playing over as your solo it's called the standard 12-bar blues progression and it's really popular but the only thing you really need to concern yourself with is the fact that it's twelve measures or twelve bars long and each one of those bars has four beats in it so you need to count so long as you play your solo to keep track of where you are just realize that you're going to do that a total of 12 times so count of four twelve times let's go ahead and get into learning the solo now that you have the basics that you need to know down and again if you're new to guitar don't worry about scale shapes or anything like that just try to imitate what I do and memorize the pattern of notes as we learn the solo now since this is a twelve bar solo or twelve measure solo what we're going to do is break this down into three four-bar phrases so the soules a little bit easier to learn now we're only going to be using half notes and whole notes throughout this entire solo and if you don't know what that means I'll tell you real quick a whole note looks like a whole circle and it gets four full beats a half note looks like a whole note with a little stem on it and they only get two beats just keep that in mind as we learn this all right find the twelfth fret of the g string and put your first finger on there again that's usually the fret with two dots on it so that might help you if that doesn't just count 12 with your first finger right behind the fret and then pick that note with the down stroke you're going to notice that that note has an arrow with a fraction 1/2 pointing up that means you're gonna push up a little bit on that string just to give it some style bend it up or you can pull down on it too it's really up to you trying to imitate that sound and that's a whole note so you're gonna hold that out for the entire first measure so count 1 3 4 or you can pull down again 4 so that may be new to you bending like that and your finger may be sore for a while and may have to build up some strength in that index finger to do that one tip is you can put your thumb over the fret board to get some leverage of your bending of it that'll help if you're pulling down you probably don't want to do that call want to keep your thumb bonding but just get used to doing it the other way and that's the whole first measure would three four and then you're going to come to the fourteenth fret of the D string or the fourth thickest string there with your third finger that's the next note and you're going to see a squiggly line over that whole note there and that just means to give it some vibrato for style and you can do this or not do this it's really up to you make sure you're just gonna bend it over and over again finger this down or you can bend it up or bet it down mmm but that's going to be our recurring thing throughout the solo and we're going to keep coming back to it you'll see so three four so that will be a great starting point just getting those two notes and practice them over and over again as a matter of fact measures three and four are the exact same thing you just play that phrase twice so the first four measures of the soul will be four so practice that over and over again and at first if all you can do is not bend that note really try to get that been today alright until the next four bar a some measures five through eight you're going to start on the fourteenth fret of the g string or the third thinnest string with your third finger that's a whole note there so you're just gonna play that and hold it out for four beats oh boy the next measure goes to the twelfth read of that same string with your first finger and here's our first half note so you're going to only going to hold this note out for two beats so we then move back to that fourteenth fret with your third finger on that same string that's another half note there so four beats three and four that measure play that note so those first two bars or measures of the second phrase will be and you may have to look back at your picking hand to make sure you're hitting the right string that can be really hard when you start out but don't let that slow you down just make sure you look back and work on your aim with your picking in measure seven and eight or the last two measures of the second four bar phrase of the solo go back to your little recurring theme though so same exact thing twelfth fret of the g string or third thinnest string with your first finger bend it up hold on 4 and then 14th fret of the fourth string there let me play that whole second phrase for your measures five six seven and eight one two three four poor take your time of this give this second for by phrase down really well to where you don't have to think about it too much to play it and then you can move on to the third and final four bar phrase down starts off on the twelfth fret of the second thinnest string with your first finger that's a whole note so play that going through bullet then hop over to the twelfth fret of the thinnest string and play that one for another whole mode and that can be a little bit tricky because you kind of have to either roll your index finger over well have a little gap in between those notes where there's a roll I can do this [Laughter] [Applause] measure eleven kind of repeats our recurring things in a little bit different way we're going to use half notes to played and it's going to be up one octave higher don't worry too much about that just put your pinky on the 15th part of the highest string you're going to play a half note there play one C and bend it up just like you did with the first note you play you know you're just going to take that 15th fret of the high E string and play one you can bend it up a little you can use all your fingers to help end up on that that'll make it easier for you and bring your thumb over the edge of the Fripp what did I give you from leverage so what king and then you're going to come down with the 12th fret of the thinnest string with your first finger and play another happen up there so then the last measure just kind of roll your index finger over or hop your finger over to the 12th fret of the b-string ii finished string and play a whole note there let me play that entire last four bar phrase for you here you go one two three four I know that could be a lot to think about you know fretting hand picking hand what notes to play when to bend to know when to put vibrato on a note but take it one four bar phrase at a time or work on each one until you can try to put them together and play the whole thing – all at once I'll give you an example of what that sounds like with the jam track right now Hey and Hey I know this is pretty simple but if you can play through that solo you're doing a great job and you've proven to yourself that you can play lead guitar now if you have any questions about soloing or playing lead guitar you can leave them in the comments below and I'll get back to you or if you have a friend that's been wanting to get into playing lead but they haven't taken that initial step you know just share this video with them that we can take this journey together there's so much more to learn as far as lead guitar goes and this is really just the tip of the iceberg if you're interested in learning more you should check out the guitar toolbox it's a free bundle of over 50 step-by-step lessons covering nine essential topics you can find out more about it at guitar lessons comm slash toolbox go grab it right now and I'll see you in a future video

16 thoughts on “How To Play A Guitar Solo – Beginner Guitar Lesson”

  1. Thanks for the Video clip! Apologies for chiming in, I would appreciate your opinion. Have you tried – Riddleagan Blossoming Solo Remedy (Sure I saw it on Google)? It is an awesome one off guide for mastering guitar scales minus the hard work. Ive heard some awesome things about it and my cousin finally got astronomical results with it.

  2. Kudos for the video content! Forgive me for butting in, I would love your opinion. Have you heard about – Riddleagan Blossoming Solo Remedy (google it)? It is a great one of a kind product for mastering guitar scales without the normal expense. Ive heard some amazing things about it and my BF after a lifetime of fighting got great results with it.

  3. Excellent Video clip! Excuse me for butting in, I would love your thoughts. Have you heard about – Riddleagan Blossoming Solo Remedy (do a search on google)? It is an awesome exclusive product for mastering guitar scales without the hard work. Ive heard some super things about it and my work buddy after a lifetime of fighting got astronomical success with it.

  4. I would add that trying to bend strings on an acoustic is much harder than bending strings on an electric. Not impossible, just harder.

  5. the easiest guitar to play with first is the process that are because that's what I'm using

  6. As usual, a very well constructed lesson and well conceived for relative beginners. My only criticism is your use of distortion; it's somewhat grating to the ear. A little bit of OD is fine to help with sustain, but I never take to the amount of distortion you like to use.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *