How The Elements Got Their Names


Why do we give names to all the elements?
No matter what we call them, it doesn’t change the experiments. Ah, there’s so much more behind each label
Here’s the story of the names on the periodic table The first name, hydrogen, means it likes to
form water While the last one sounds like a spell from
Harry Potter Silicon is named for a rock in the ground
And many more are called for where they are found Sulfur’s just sulfur, as far back as we know
And calx and borax date from quite a while ago This one’s from a red stone, and this one’s
yellow And one’s from a rock named for this Russian
fellow Chromium’s compounds have colorful sheens
Bromine stinks, and chlorine wafts green Bismuth starts white, until its colors come
out Zinc has pointy crystals, and barium’s stout Indium’s not for India as you may have learned
It’s just one of four color spectra this bunch makes when they burn They tasted aluminum and thought it was bitter
Rhodium’s rose, Iodine’s violet and zirconium a gold-like glitter Speaking of gold, the name’s different from
the symbol slapped on Our mouths speak “shining yellow” while we
abbreviate “shining dawn” Many other names don’t match abbreviations
And those can be confusing situations Potash, or kalium, comes from burnt wood
While nater, or soda, made headaches feel good For a few more, one language can’t settle
Like, Ferrum is latin, but iron’s a “holy metal” Tungsten in America beat Wolfram from across
the pond But niobium not columbium that compromise
spawned Many names are the products of reactions
Bringing forth acid, or nitre, or charcoal transactions They found osmium thanks to its distinctive
smell And fluorine in fluorspar which makes metals
flow well Antimony means dead monk OR never alone
And Lithium’s the first alkali that was found in a stone Splitting this mineral gave elements two,
praseodymium the green twin and neodymium the new There’s a group of idle gases that don’t react
One was named by a child, little-known fact. Dysprosium’s not the only one playing hard
to get For a long time ores held Lanthanum’s secret Astatine’s unstable and will quickly decay
Like these radioactives, all three meaning “ray” Technetium’s so rare we found it by making
it And these are so new that they haven’t even
been named yet The Greeks thought molybdenum might have been
lead, While the Spaniard’s “little silver” was Platinum
instead Cadmium’s in calamine, for Cadmus the prince
And lots more from mythology have been added since There’s goblins and devils and even mighty
Thor Who walked on Iris’ rainbow to Asgard’s door There’s Vanadis, Tantalus, Ceres, and the
Titans The giver of fire, and the one whose light
brightens Speaking of light we found Helium in the sun,
And Mercury, that liquid silver, is a planetary one There’s an asteroid, Earth, and even the moon
Uranus, pluto and also neptune There’s a crazy story behind 93, it was named
for Italy by Enrico Fermi But his science was wrong, and when his Nobel
came along, he snuck off to the States to be free. A river, a state, a college, a lab called
Livermore And one mine in Sweden gave us names for four Cyprus and Magnesia, places so old
Russia and Scandinavia, places so cold We could draw a map of Europe with the places
that remain But is Gallium for France? Or the discoverer’s
name? The rest are for people, but those are pretty
clear. They found half this stuff, they deserve to
be here! Thanks for watching, and . . . stay curious.
I’m officially out of rhymes, so subscribe to see more
of us.

100 thoughts on “How The Elements Got Their Names”

  1. There are already names for elements 113, 115, 117 and 118. 113 is Nihonium. 115 is Moscovium. 117 is Tenessine, and then 118 is Ogannesson. Better start making rhymes for them now.

  2. Bismuth starts white until its color comes out. So that's why Bismuth from Steven Universe has an innie gem that is very colorful.

  3. Nirmala bolar n rakshit bolar are fraud .both hv runaway from Mumbai India to Africa in 2001 n cheated me with 21 lakhs .if u kno his/her adress plz let me kno.they are parents of nimay

  4. Nickel doesn't mean devil. It was a name given to mountain demons or spirits that would supposedly enchant the ore, so you couldn't get any copper from it despite it looking like copper ore.

  5. Harry Potter one is bullshit – it simply means 118 in latin, that's how it got it's name. If you're going to mention it, at least explain it.

  6. I've just found the rhyme I'll sing to my future children every night when they fall asleep! and When I tuck them in after they're sleeping Ill whisper to them "its ok to be smart"
    sidenote: because of this channel I'm officially a PBS donor and when they say "thanks to viewers like you" Ill smile a little bit.

  7. Guys why you were not there when I was doing my school šŸ™ (I am taking about 1993). I would have so good in science. My problem was always to to know "WHY" and you guys are solving. Sorry to say but I am envy of my daughter who is in 1st grade and this age !!!

  8. <div><span style="color:#ff0000;">E</span><span style="color:#ff0700;">v</span><span style="color:#ff0e00;">e</span><span style="color:#ff1500;">r</span><span style="color:#ff1c00;">y</span><span style="color:#ff2300;">o</span><span style="color:#ff2a00;">n</span><span style="color:#ff3100;">e</span><span style="color:#ff3800;"> </span><span style="color:#ff4000;">c</span><span style="color:#ff4700;">a</span><span style="color:#ff4e00;">r</span><span style="color:#ff5500;">e</span><span style="color:#ff5c00;">s</span><span style="color:#ff6300;"> </span><span style="color:#ff6a00;">a</span><span style="color:#ff7100;">b</span><span style="color:#ff7800;">o</span><span style="color:#ff7f00;">u</span><span style="color:#ff8600;">t</span><span style="color:#ff8d00;"> </span><span style="color:#ff9400;">y</span><span style="color:#ff9b00;">o</span><span style="color:#ffa300;">u</span><span style="color:#ffaa00;">.</span><span style="color:#ffb100;"> </span><span style="color:#ffb800;">E</span><span style="color:#ffbf00;">v</span><span style="color:#ffc600;">e</span><span style="color:#ffcd00;">r</span><span style="color:#ffd400;">y</span><span style="color:#ffdb00;">o</span><span style="color:#ffe300;">n</span><span style="color:#ffea00;">e</span><span style="color:#fff100;"> </span><span style="color:#fff800;">s</span><span style="color:#ffff00;">h</span><span style="color:#f1ff00;">a</span><span style="color:#e3ff00;">r</span><span style="color:#d5ff00;">e</span><span style="color:#c6ff00;">s</span><span style="color:#b8ff00;"> </span><span style="color:#aaff00;">9</span><span style="color:#9cff00;">9</span><span style="color:#8eff00;">.</span><span style="color:#80ff00;">9</span><span style="color:#71ff00;">%</span><span style="color:#63ff00;"> </span><span style="color:#55ff00;">o</span><span style="color:#47ff00;">f</span><span style="color:#39ff00;"> </span><span style="color:#2bff00;">D</span><span style="color:#1cff00;">N</span><span style="color:#0eff00;">A</span><span style="color:#00ff00;"> </span><span style="color:#00ff0d;">w</span><span style="color:#00ff1b;">i</span><span style="color:#00ff28;">t</span><span style="color:#00ff36;">h</span><span style="color:#00ff43;"> </span><span style="color:#00ff51;">y</span><span style="color:#00ff5e;">o</span><span style="color:#00ff6b;">u</span><span style="color:#00ff79;">.</span><span style="color:#00ff86;"> </span><span style="color:#00ff94;">Y</span><span style="color:#00ffa1;">o</span><span style="color:#00ffae;">u</span><span style="color:#00ffbc;"> </span><span style="color:#00ffc9;">a</span><span style="color:#00ffd7;">r</span><span style="color:#00ffe4;">e</span><span style="color:#00fff2;"> </span><span style="color:#00ffff;">E</span><span style="color:#00f1ff;">a</span><span style="color:#00e3ff;">r</span><span style="color:#00d5ff;">t</span><span style="color:#00c6ff;">h</span><span style="color:#00b8ff;">.</span><span style="color:#00aaff;"> </span><span style="color:#009cff;">Y</span><span style="color:#008eff;">o</span><span style="color:#0080ff;">u</span><span style="color:#0071ff;"> </span><span style="color:#0063ff;">w</span><span style="color:#0055ff;">i</span><span style="color:#0047ff;">l</span><span style="color:#0039ff;">l</span><span style="color:#002bff;"> </span><span style="color:#001cff;">f</span><span style="color:#000eff;">i</span><span style="color:#0000ff;">n</span><span style="color:#0800ff;">d</span><span style="color:#0f00ff;"> </span><span style="color:#1700ff;">t</span><span style="color:#1f00ff;">h</span><span style="color:#2700ff;">e</span><span style="color:#2e00ff;"> </span><span style="color:#3600ff;">l</span><span style="color:#3e00ff;">u</span><span style="color:#4600ff;">c</span><span style="color:#4d00ff;">k</span><span style="color:#5500ff;">y</span><span style="color:#5d00ff;"> </span><span style="color:#6400ff;">n</span><span style="color:#6c00ff;">u</span><span style="color:#7400ff;">m</span><span style="color:#7c00ff;">b</span><span style="color:#8300ff;">e</span><span style="color:#8b00ff;">r</span><span style="color:#9100f1;">.</span><span style="color:#9800e3;"> </span><span style="color:#9e00d5;">L</span><span style="color:#a500c6;">u</span><span style="color:#ab00b8;">c</span><span style="color:#b200aa;">k</span></div><div><span style="color:#b8009c;">L</span><span style="color:#bf008e;">u</span><span style="color:#c50080;">c</span><span style="color:#cb0071;">k</span></div><div><span style="color:#d20063;">L</span><span style="color:#d80055;">u</span><span style="color:#df0047;">c</span><span style="color:#e50039;">k</span></div><div><span style="color:#ec002b;">L</span><span style="color:#f2001c;">u</span><span style="color:#f9000e;">c</span><span style="color:#ff0000;">k</span></div>

  9. Actually "Sufra" in Arabic means the Yellowish thing, but in Modern Arabic we call that element "Kibreet". And "Buraq" is something related to lightening or sparks.

  10. Why do we give names to all the elements? No matter what we call them, it doesn't change the experiments. There's so much more behind each label. Here's a story of the names on the periodic table.

    The first name, Hydrogen, means it likes to form water. While the last one sounds like a spell from Harry Potter. Silicon's named for a rock in the ground, and many more called from where they are found. Sulfur's just sulfur, as far back as we know. And calx, and borax state from– quite a while ago. This one's from a red stone, and this one's yellow. And one's from a rock named for this Russian fellow. Chromium's compounds have colorful sheens. Bromine stinks, and Chlorine wafts green. Bismuth starts white, 'til its colors come out. Zinc has pointy crystals, and Barium's stout. Indium's not for India, as you may have learned. It's just one of four color spectra, that this bunch makes when they burn. They tasted Aluminum and thought it was bitter. Rhodium's rose, Iodine's violet, and Zirconium? A gold-like glitter. Speaking of gold, the name's different from the symbol slapped on. Our mouths speak "shining yellow" while we abbreviate "shining dawn." Many other names don't match abbreviations. And those can be… confusing situations. Potash, or Kalium, comes from burnt wood, while nater, or soda, made headaches feel good. For a few more, one language can't settle. Like… Ferrum's Latin, but Iron's… a holy metal. Tungsten in America beat Wolfram from across the pond, but Niobium, not Columbium, that compromise spawned. Many names are the products of reactions. Bringing forth acid, or nitre, or charcoal transactions. They found Osmium thanks to its distinctive smell. And fluorine in fluorspar makes metals flow well. Antimony means dead monk, or never alone. And Lithium's the first alkali that was found in a stone.

    "Lithic… (i, t, h…) i-c. Meaning stone."

    Splitting this mineral gave elements two. Praseodymium the green twin, and Neodymium the new. There's a group of idle gases that don't react. One was named by a child… little known fact! Dysprosium's not the only one playing hard to get. For a long time. ores held Lanthanum's secret. Astatine's unstable and will quickly decay, like these three radioactives, all meaning "ray." Technetium's so rare that we found it by making it. And these are so new that they haven't been named yet. The Greeks thought Molybdenum might have been lead, while the Spaniards' "little silver" was Platinum instead. Cadmium's in calamine for Cadmus the prince. Lots more from mythology have been added since. There's goblins and devils, and even mighty Thor, who walked down Iris's rainbow to Asgard's door. There's Vanadis, Tantalus, Ceres and the Titans. The giver of fire, and the one who's light brightens. Speaking of light, we found Helium in the Sun. And Mercury, that liquid silver, is a planetary one. There's an asteroid, Earth, and even the moon. Uranus, Pluto, and also Neptune.

    There's a funny story behind 93. It was named for Italy by Enrico Fermi. But his science was wrong, and when as Nobel came along, he snuck off to the states to be free.

    A river, state, college, a lab called Livermore. And one mine in Sweden gave us names for four! Cyprus and Magnesia, places so old. Russia and Scandinavia, places so cold… We could draw a map of Europe with the places that remain, but is Gallium for France? Or the discoverer's name? The rest are for people, but that's pretty clear. They found half this stuff… they DESERVE to be here!

    Thanks for watching and… stay curious. I'm officially out of rhymes so… subscribe to see more of us…?

  11. I already memorize it all in order but I always forget to say the potassium I love this coolest part of science ever loving it

  12. 1:48 Wow! That's the first Monk reference I've ever seen on the internet! The adventures of the Obsessive Compulsive Detective made up a large part of my childhood!

  13. These are all the gems I can name. Peridot, holy blue agate, diamond, emerald, ruby, sapphire, garnet, lapis, bismuth, rose quartz, blueberry quarts, pearl, sardonyx, amethyst, smokey quarts, opal, alexandrite, topaz, aqua marine, jasper, zircon, rainbow quarts, malachite, sugalite, moonstone, and snowflake obsidian.

  14. How the heck I ended up watching this video?
    Am I on the dark side of youtube again?
    I was just watching cute kitties videos

  15. Wanna hear a joke about sodium Na Naa Naaa Naaaaa Naaaaaaa Naaaaaaaaaaaaa Naaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa Naaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa NaaaaaaaaaaazaaaaaaaaaaaaaaĆ aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaĆ aa Naaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa Naaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa Naaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa NaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaĆ aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa NaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaĆ aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaĆ aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

  16. Nihonium was named for the discoverersā€™ Japan,
    While moscovium was named near the place it was planned,
    But they never wouldā€™ve existed without Tennessee,
    Which got its own element, as did Yuri.

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