Adult Basic Education Direct Service – Division of Adult Education Grant Competition Webinar


Welcome to the Adult Basic
Education Direct Service 064 Grant Competition Webinar. This is a
repeat of Monday’s webinar, hence the February 26th date. There is
one additional slide in this presentation in the tips section –
otherwise, this is an exact repeat of Monday’s webinar. The contents of this
webinar complement, but do not replace, the request for grant application
guidelines. Interested applicants should also carefully read the Adult Education
and Family Literacy Guidelines, and division of adult education policies, on
the division of adult education grant competition webpage, before deciding to
submit an application. The guidelines have already been posted. The policies
will be posted by the end of the week. We will not be answering questions during
this webinar. We will provide information at the end on how to submit questions. This webinar will provide information on
the grant application review and award processes. We will provide a general
overview of the required and allowable activities and other requirements for
grantees. Finally, we will provide suggested resources and grant tips. Here
are some key dates related to this grant: On February 17th, 2018, a notice of
availability of grant funds was posted to the Pennsylvania Bulletin. Posting in
the Bulletin allows us to reach the greatest number of potential applicants.
PDE posted the Request for Grant Application guidelines for the Adult
Basic Education direct service grant to the division of adult education grant
competition’s webpage this past Friday, February 23rd. The grants competition
webpage also contains several resource documents and links to the Pennsylvania
WIOA combined state plan and regional and local workforce plans. We
originally held the webinar on Monday, and we are repeating it today. The grant
applications will be available in eGrants today, Wednesday, February 28th.
Agencies that submitted emails to the ra-able account indicating
interest in specific applications by yesterday afternoon will be able to
create their grant applications today. If you have not submitted an email to the
ra-able account indicating which applications or which grants you would
like to apply for, you must take that step before you will be able to create
your application. We have posted PDFs of the grant content on the grant
competition’s web page for your reference; however, the grant applications will be
submitted via the eGrants system. The deadline for applicants to complete the
grant application is April 3rd, 2018 at 2 p.m. Please note the 2:00 p.m. deadline. The Federal Adult Education and Family
Literacy Act, Title 2 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA),
provides funds to be awarded through the Pennsylvania Department of Education
Office of Post-secondary and Higher Education Division of Adult Education to
provide adult basic education services throughout the state. The federal funding
available for awards to provide Adult Basic Education direct service
programming through this competition is approximately 13 million dollars. Pennsylvania Act 143 of 1986 Adult and
Family Literacy Education Act provides funds to be awarded through the
Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) Office of Post-secondary and Higher
Education Division of Adult Education to provide Adult Basic Education and Family
Literacy services throughout the state. The total state funding available for
awards to provide Adult Basic Education programming through this competition is
eight million, three hundred eighty four thousand, two hundred and eighty eight
dollars. Both the federal and state dollar amounts are estimates and are
subject to change based on actual federal and state budgets. The Adult
Basic Education direct service grant has a single narrative to describe the
overall program. There are three possible budgets. Most applicants will have
federal and state. Some of those may also choose to apply for the State Optional
Tutoring Program funds. Those will have three budgets. Applicants that are only
eligible applicants under the federal law will only have the federal adult
education budget. Fifteen percent of the available state funding (1 million, two
hundred fifty-seven thousand, six hundred and forty-three dollars) will be reserved
for the optional tutor training competition portion of the grant
application. Both federal and state funds, excluding the 15 percent reserved for
tutor training, will be allocated among the 22 local workforce development areas
using a needs-based funding formula. Formula details are provided in Appendix
B of the request for grant application guidelines. An eligible applicant must have
demonstrated effectiveness in providing adult basic and literacy activities and
helping students achieve the listed outcomes. Adult basic and literacy
activities are academic instruction below the post-secondary level that
increased student’s ability to read, write and speak in English and perform
mathematics. Applicants must provide quantitative data related to their
provision of adult basic and literacy activities and student outcomes for the
immediate preceding three program years. In other words, applicants must have
provided Adult Basic Education services for the last three years. The services do
not have to have been provided with the division funds, however. Applicants must
provide data that demonstrate the applicant’s success in helping students
achieve the following outcomes: improve skills in mathematics, reading, writing,
and/or English language proficiency, earn a high school equivalency credential, get
a job, retain a job, and enter post-secondary education or training. The
data must include the number of individuals in each cohort, the number of
those individuals who successfully achieved the outcome, and the resulting
outcome. Applicants will also have to provide an explanation of the criteria
used to assign individuals to each cohort and to determine achievement of
the outcome and how the data were collected. Entities that are not able to
provide the data needed for demonstrated effectiveness are not eligible providers
and will not be able to receive grant funds. So if your agency has not provided
adult basic education services during the last three years under any funding
source, you are not an eligible provider. The federal law, WIOA, and the state law,
Pennsylvania Act 143 of 1986, have slightly different lists of the types of
entities that are eligible to apply for funds. Refer to the section on eligible
applicants in the Request for Grant Application guidelines for the specific
lists. In some cases, entities that are eligible under WIOA are not eligible
under Act 143. Those entities may only apply for federal funds. All entities
that are eligible under both WIOA and Act 143 must apply for both federal
and state adult education funds. A consortium or coalition of eligible
applicants may apply for a grant. For the purposes of this competition, for both
federal and state funds, a consortium or coalition of agencies is defined as a
main grantee with one or more sub- grantees. the main grantee will serve as
both the fiscal agent for the grant and as a provider of some of the services
proposed in the grant application. the main grantee is responsible for
ensuring that all activities provided are completed as proposed and is
responsible for monitoring and compliance of the sub-grantees. answers
in the grant application should reflect the work of the consortium or coalition
as a whole rather than treat each entity separately. Refer to section 205 point
4 of the program guidelines – that’s the adult education and family literacy
guidelines – for more information about the responsibilities of the main grantee
in a consortium or coalition. Agencies can only be a main grantee or a sub-
grantee. No agency can have an adult basic education direct service grant
with the division of adult education and also be a sub-grantee on another adult
basic Eeucation direct service grant. Full details regarding all minimum
requirements for adult basic education and family literacy programs are
available in the adult education and family literacy guidelines, which is
posted on the division of adult education grant competition’s webpage.
Successful applicants for Adult Basic Education direct service 064
grant funds must demonstrate the capacity to provide a full range of
services throughout the course of a program year. Programs must provide the
following to be considered full service: year-round classroom instruction and
support services including during the summer. Programs may have a reduced
schedule over the summer but must ensure access to instruction and support
services. Funded programs may not shut down over the summer or for an extended
winter break. Adult education and literacy activities and instruction for
Adult Basic Education (ABE) to adult- I’m sorry, to high adult secondary education
(ASE) including high school equivalency test preparation, as needed. In other
words, an applicant cannot propose to provide a limited range of services such
as serving only individuals at beginning literacy (ABE) for only students who are at
the adult secondary level. Funded programs must have services that allow a
student to enter at any educational level and progress through programming
in the program. Supplemental computer-based distance learning
opportunities to students participating in face-to-face instruction who are
interested in such services. We will provide more information about this
requirement on a later slide. Support services to help students address
barriers to participation, Support services to help students
identify education and career goals, develop employability skills, and
successfully transition to post-secondary education or training, or
employment, as appropriate. Integration of workforce preparation activities into
instruction and support services. Workforce preparation activities are
designed to help students develop critical thinking skills, problem-solving
skills, digital literacy skills, and
self-management skills, including competencies in using information and
resources, working with others, and understanding systems. A cadre of
volunteer classroom aides to provide additional instructional support to
students participating in classroom instruction. All grant recipients must
use at least 5% of the state grant funds to support a tutoring program that
recruits, trains, and supports volunteer classroom aides. Section A.A.3 of the
adult education and family literacy guidelines provides details about this
activity. A program administrator who is a full-time employee of the grantee
agency. The person does not have to be full-time on division of adult
education grant activities. If the program administrator is not working
100% on division-funded activities, the agency must provide evidence that this
individual has sufficient time allocated to division-funded activities to meet
all of the requirements of the program administrator position. The program
administrator does not have to be paid from grant funds; however, the person must
have sufficient time allocated to activities supported to the grant. All
adult basic education direct service grantees are required to be partners at
a local PA CareerLink site and fulfill all the roles and responsibilities
of a one-stop partner. The roles and responsibilities include entering into a
Memorandum of Understanding with the local workforce board, contributing to
infrastructure costs of the PA CareerLink site, providing access to
adult basic education services through the PA CareerLink site, and providing
career services to eligible one-stop participants. Section A.A.1.3 of the
adult education and family literacy guidelines provides more information. In
addition, we will post a draft updated policy, G-100 Adult Education and the
Workforce Development System, to the division of adult education grant
competition’s webpage by the end of the week. English language acquisition
activities and instruction for English as a Second Language (ESL) students based
on area needs. Such instruction must include supporting ESL students to
transition successfully to Adult Basic Education or Adult Secondary Education
instruction within the programming funded by the grant and to earn a high
school equivalency credential if needed. PDE has identified 18 counties in which
successful applicants must provide these services. See Appendix C of the request
for grant application guidelines. Entities proposing services in the other
counties are allowed to provide ESL services as needed but are not mandated
to. Programs must refer appropriate students to the statewide distance
learning project and support them as appropriate.
This activity is different from the requirement to provide supplemental
computer-based distance learning opportunities to students in
face-to-face classes, which we will discuss on the next slide. Distance learning is defined in the
technical assistance guide for performance accountability under the
Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act national reporting system for adult
education as a formal learning activity in which the students and instructors
are separated by geography, time, or both. The use of computer-based curricula or
other computer-based learning activities that take place during classroom
instruction are not distance learning activities. Homework assignments are not
distance learning activities, either. adult basic education programs funded by
the division of adult education will provide blended learning to interested
students. In blended learning, students participate in both face-to-face
instruction and distance learning activities. The distance learning
activities are additional instruction to provide students with a greater
intensity of instruction focused on their specific needs and interests to
help them achieve their goals and outcomes more quickly. Students
participating in distance learning opportunities with the local program
must also be attending face-to-face classes. Distance learning may not be
provided in lieu of class attendance. Eligible participants that are not able
to attend face-to-face instruction at a local program may be referred to the
statewide distance learning project for services. Participation in supplemental
distance learning opportunities is not required for all students, but all funded
programs must provide such services to students who are interested. Programs are
expected to tell students about these opportunities as part of orientation to
the adult education program. A draft of the updated policy, D-130 Distance
Learning, which includes the computer-based distance learning
curricula that are currently approved for local programs to begin using in
program year 2018-19, will be posted to the division of adult
education grant competition’s webpage. In addition to the required services
identified in the preview in the previous slides, applicants may propose
to provide one or more of the following activities: corrections education, which
includes adult education and literacy services for adults who are in
correctional facilities to ensure that Pennsylvania does not exceed the federal
and state ceilings for corrections education. Applicants may not budget or
expend more than 20% of the grant amounts for corrections education. There
are some additional requirements for corrections education in Section A.A.2
of the adult education and family literacy guidelines. Integrated English
literacy and civics education activities – this is referring to the activity, not to
the Section 243 program, which is conducted through the 061 grant. These
are education services that combine literacy instruction, English language
acquisition instruction, and instruction on the rights and
responsibilities of citizenship and civic participation. Integrated education
and training activities (IET activities) are allowable with federal funds only.
Any IET activities proposed in the grant application will have to be approved by
the division of adult education before the class starts. Workplace literacy
activities. Workplace literacy activities are adult basic education services
offered in collaboration with an employer at a workplace for incumbent
workers. They should not be confused with the workforce preparation activities
described earlier. Applicants should refer to the adult education and family
literacy guidelines for more information on these activities to ensure that
proposed activities are compliant. Pennsylvania Act 143 requires that 20%
of the state funds allocated for adult basic education be used for programs
that recruit, train, and support volunteer adult literacy education instructors,
also known as volunteer tutors. These individuals provide one-on-one and small
group tutoring. The division of adult education recognizes that not all
eligible providers of adult basic education have the capacity to use 20%
of the state grant funds to support a tutoring program. Therefore, the division
is reserving 15% of the state allocation for a sub-competition for optional
tutoring program funds within the main adult basic education direct service 064 competition. The remaining 5% of the mandated 20% must be used by
successful adult basic education direct service grant recipients to support
volunteer classroom aides as described earlier. Applicants for the Adult Basic
Education direct service 064 grant that are eligible applicants for state
funds may choose to also apply for additional funds under the state
optional tutoring program sub-project for the sole purpose of supporting a
program to recruit, train, and support volunteer tutors to provide one-on-one
and/or small group instruction. Details regarding the requirements for tutoring
programs are in Appendix A of the adult education and family literacy program
guidelines. The optional tutoring program funds are only available as part of the
larger adult basic education direct service 064 grant. Applicants may not
apply for only optional tutoring program funds; however, review of the optional
tutoring program proposal will be independent of the review of the main grant.
Therefore, it is possible that applicants for federal and state funds that also
apply for tutoring program funds will receive the main funds but not the
tutoring program funds. Funds awarded under the optional tutoring program
sub-project may only be used to cover costs directly associated with
recruiting, training, and supporting tutors. All costs associated with the
provision of services to the students served by the tutors must be allocated
to the main 064 adult education grant. No administrative costs may be
charged to the tutoring program sub- project budget. Programs that are awarded
optional tutoring program funds must have tutoring programs established and
providing services as proposed during program year 2018-19. Programs that do
not meet this requirement will not have the additional tutoring program portion
of the grant renewed in the following program years. There are two types of
tutoring programs that applicants may propose under the optional tutoring
program: a community-based tutoring program and a prison based peer tutoring
program. Applicants may provide one or both. The division of adult education no
longer allows the literacy core model. Requirements for each type of program
are explained in Section AA3 of the adult education and family literacy
program guidelines. We are providing some key information here. For community-based
tutoring programs: programs receiving additional state 064 funds for a
community-based tutoring program must have at least one tutor coordinator who
works at least 20 hours per week on tutoring program activities. The division
strongly recommends that the tutor coordinator be a dedicated full-time
position. Peer tutors must provide one-on-one or
small group instruction to students for a minimum of three hours per week. They
must have a bachelor’s degree or be participating in an AmeriCorps program.
Volunteer tutors are required to have written lesson plans for all tutoring or
small group sessions and should work with tutor coordinators to review goals
and adjust student placement as needed. Volunteer tutors may not administer the
standardized assessments used by the agency for reporting purposes unless
they have completed the mandatory assessment training. Volunteer tutors are
required to participate in initial tutor training and additional professional
development learning opportunities while at the program. For prison-based peer
tutoring program: peer tutoring is an instructional model that uses one
institutionalized individual to assist in providing or enhancing learning
opportunities for other institutionalized individuals. A peer
tutoring program must be structured and overseen by educators who assist with
training and supervising tutors, setting educational goals, establishing an
individual plan of instruction, and monitoring progress. This is in
accordance with WIOA regulations for 63.3. Prison-based
peer tutoring program must have a full-time dedicated peer tutoring
program coordinator. The coordinator is responsible for structuring, coordinating,
and overseeing the peer tutoring program. This person is responsible for
recruiting, training, and supervising tutors, setting educational goals,
establishing the individual plan of instruction for each student in the
program, developing lesson plans for the peer tutors to use, and/or assisting peer
tutors to develop lesson plans and monitoring progress. The peer tutoring
coordinator should be trained to administer the standardized assessments
used by the program for reporting purposes. The minimum
qualifications for the peer tutoring program coordinator are a bachelor’s
degree and previous experience as an educator, preferably with adults, and as
an instructional leader. A peer tutor is an institutionalized individual who
assists in providing or enhancing learning opportunities for other
institutionalized individuals. Peer tutors must have a high school diploma
or equivalent. A peer tutoring program is corrections education; therefore, funds
used for peer tutoring program count towards the 20% cap on state grant funds
for corrections education. Participants served by division funded adult basic
education programs cannot be enrolled or be required to be enrolled in secondary
education. All participants must demonstrate a need for basic skills
development based on the results of one of the approved standardized assessments
administered before instruction starts. Participants served in classes paid with
federal funds must be at least 16 years old. Please note that in Pennsylvania, the
compulsory school age is 17. Therefore, 16 year olds are generally required to be
enrolled in school. Programs must have evidence that any 16 year olds in the
program are not required to be enrolled in secondary school. Participants
receiving services under state funds must be at least 17 year years old, must
be Pennsylvania residents, and in addition to not being enrolled in
secondary school, they cannot be enrolled in post-secondary school. As a result of
this last requirement, programs cannot offer integrated education and training
programs with state funds. In awarding funds, PDE will prioritize
funding through the review and rating process to grant applications from
eligible providers with past effectiveness in providing high-quality
services that improve the skills of eligible participants and help those
participants to earn high school equivalency credentials, gain and retain
employment, and/or transition to post-secondary education or training. PDE
will prioritize funding for those applications that demonstrate a thorough
and detailed plan for a full service adult basic education Program aligned
with local needs that meet all of the minimum requirements described earlier
in the webinar and that provide evidence of the applicant’s organizational
capacity to meet all of the programmatic, reporting, administrative, and fiscal
requirements of the grants, a variety of instructional options, including
instructional models, times, and locations, to meet the scheduling needs of students.
High-quality instruction that is based on best practices and the College and
Career Readiness standards for adult education and is of sufficient intensity
to lead to student outcomes. Services that align with the strategies and goals
of the local workforce area, is defined in the local plan and with the
activities and services of the PA career link site partners. High-quality student
support services that help students to persist and succeed in adult basic
education services and meet their personal, educational, and career goals. Applicants must demonstrate that they
have the required staffing and that the staff members of the adult basic
education program are well-trained and meet the minimum requirements
established by PDE. Refer to program guidelines – that’s the
adult education and family literacy guidelines – sections 204 and subsections
204.1 to 204.7 for details. Program administrators,
coordinators, tutor trainers, instructional staff, and student support
staff must have at least a bachelor’s degree. All programs are required to have
a data quality specialist. The data quality specialist is not simply a
clerical position doing data entry. This person is responsible for the accuracy
and quality of the data reported to the division of adult education. As a result
the division has established minimum requirements for this role. The person
serving is the data quality specialist must have a bachelor’s degree or a
post-secondary credential in data management. Any additional data entry
staff who are overseen by the data quality specialist may be clerical staff.
The division recommends that programs have additional data entry staff, if
possible. Beginning in program year 2018- 19, programs will be required to enter
all data within 14 days of the data being collected once e-data is open for
the program year. Current staff members without the required credentials who are
currently in these positions may be grandfathered for the same position for
program year 18-19. The division of adult education is imposing additional
requirements for teachers of mathematics at the College and Career Readiness
standards Level E. These individuals must have secondary math teaching
certification or a bachelor’s degree or higher that ensures knowledge of
mathematics required of certified math teachers. Referr to section 204 of the
adult education and family literacy guidelines for a link to a document
listing the required knowledge. To support local programs in helping
students access math instruction at the College and Career Readiness standards
Level E, the division of adult education is requiring the successful applicant
for the statewide distance learning project to provide distance learning
classes in this content area. As stated earlier in the webinar, both federal and
state funds have been allocated to local workforce areas using a needs-based
funding formula. The resulting allocations are listed in Appendix B of
the Request for Grant Application guidelines. The amounts have been further
broken out by the counties within each local workforce area that consists of
multiple counties. Applicants are not required to apply for all of the funds
allocated to a workforce area. Furthermore, applicants are allowed to
apply for funds from multiple workforce areas in their applications. If an
applicant requests funds for a county, it must ensure that it provides services
that are accessible to residents of that county. Because the division is requiring
grantees to be full service programs, we have established minimum funding
requests for the federal adult education and state adult education budgets. There
are a hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars and seventy five thousand
dollars respectively. The state adult education amount excludes any funds
requested under the optional tutoring program budget, which has no maximum or
minimum request amount. Applicants should should not request more funding than has been
allocated to the proposed service area. Please note that, while the allocations
to the local workforce areas all exceed the minimum amounts, many county
allocations do not. When determining proposed contract enrollment, applicants
should not exceed a cost per student of one thousand seven hundred and fifty
dollars. Grant applications will be submitted through PDE’s eGrants system.
Section three of the Request for Grant Application guidelines provides details
on getting access to the basic education direct service 064 grant application in eGrants. In the meantime, to allow applicants to review
the content of the grant application, we have posted PDFs of the grant content to
the division of adult education grant competition’s webpage. Please note that
these documents are for reference only, as the applications will be submitted
through eGrants. The eGrants system homepage has several user guides. In
addition, we will post some grant- specific tips to the division of adult
education grant competition’s webpage. The adult basic education direct service 064 grant application will open on Wednesday, February 28, 2018. The grant
application deadline is April 3rd, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. At that point, the eGrants
system will close the grant. In order to complete the grant, all sections must be
marked complete. Once all sections are marked complete, the applicant will
click the ‘complete step’ button. The eGrants system records the exact
time that the applicant clicks the button. Once the grant has been
successfully completed, the status will be ‘submitted for peer review’. After the
grant deadline, grants will be reviewed and scored. All applications will be
reviewed and scored except those that are disqualified for one or more of the
following reasons: the applicant does not meet the criteria
for eligible applicant, the application is incomplete, where the application was
not completed by the deadline. Review teams of three people will review the
grant applications using a scoring rubric. A summary of the scoring is in
Appendix A of the request for grant application guidelines. All three
sections of the grant application – the narrative, the applicant information
section, and the budgets – will be reviewed and scored. In addition, local workforce
boards will review adult basic education applications to provide services in the
local area for consistency with the local plan. The division of adult education
will provide the appropriate applications and review tools to each
local board after grants are submitted to the division via eGrants. Applicants
should not give their applications to the local boards directly for review. PDE
will take the results of the review by local boards and any related
recommendations to improve an alignment into consideration when making grant
awards. Once the applications have been reviewed and scored, they will be ranked
from highest to lowest scoring. PDE will award grants to the highest scoring
applicant in each of the local workforce development areas and will continue to
award funds until the amount allocated to the area under the needs-based
formula is reached or until all applications for service in the local
area with a sufficient score have been funded. Applications with a score of less
than 100 out of 147 will not be funded regardless of availability of funds. Note
that the minimum score of 100 is for the main application only, the optional
tutoring program score is not added to the main application score. Applications
for the optional tutoring program funds will be awarded from highest-scoring to
lowest-scoring until funds are no longer available. Applications for tutoring
program funds with a score of less than 18 of 24 on that portion of the
narrative will not be funded regardless of the availability of funds. Unsuccessful applications for the
optional tutor training funds will not play a role in the awarding of funds
under the main grant competition; however, applicants that are not awarded funds
under the main grant competition will not be awarded tutor training funds,
regardless of the score on the tutor training portion of the application.
Successful applications meeting the above criteria and under consideration
for acceptance may require revisions or submission of
addition information prior to approval. Successful
grant applications will be approved for a four year grant cycle. Grant funds will
be awarded through annual, one-year notifications of funding contingent on
the availability of funds. Each year, grantees will be required to submit
budgets and program-year-specific information via either via the eGrants
system in order to receive funding. Each year’s renewal option and grant amounts
will be based on the following criteria: contract compliance, including success in
meeting contracted enrollment and providing the contracted services,
evidence of sufficient progress in meeting the state imposed performance
standards, evidence of continuous program improvement, compliance with fiscal and
programmatic policies and guidelines, and the amount of the state and federal
appropriations. Programs that fail to successfully address the above criteria
may be terminated prior to the end of the grant cycle. PDE reserves the right
to shorten or extend the four-year grant cycle as the situation warrants. The
division of adult education is providing many resources to applicants. Links to
the resources are on the Division of Adult Education Grant Competitions
webpage, which can be accessed by going to PDE’s website at www.education.pa.gov. Select
Instruction, then Adult Basic Education to get to the Division’s homepage. From
the homepage, click on Division of Adult Education Grant Competitions link.
Applicants should review the resources both before and during the grant writing
process. The resources include the Request for Grant Application Guidelines,
the Adult Education and Family Literacy Guidelines, and relevant division
policies. We also provide links to the Pennsylvania WIOA Combined State
Plan and the regional and local workforce
plans. We do not have links to the Memoranda of Understanding for the local
PA CareerLinks in the local areas. We recommend that applicants check the
local board’s website or contact the local board for copy of the MOUs. We
strongly recommend that all agencies that are considering applying for adult
basic education direct service grant carefully read the Request for Grant
Application guidelines and the Adult Education and Family Literacy guidelines
for program year 18-19 before starting the grant application. For all applicants,
these documents will give you a very good idea of what is expected of
grantees. For currently-funded program, there are some significant changes and
new requirements to consider. Once you begin working on the grants in eGrants,
be sure to read all of the help buttons. They are blue circles with a question
mark in them next to the question. You click on the blue circle, and it will
bring up a box with the help information. The help buttons provide the maximum
characters allowable for the answer and lists information that must be addressed
in the answer. Note that the maximum character includes spaces. Make sure all
charts and tables are complete when composing the responses for each item in
the grant application. Make sure the answers address the information that is
being requested. Avoid including information that is not relevant to the
item. Make sure the responses are clear and concise and do not assume that the
reviewers know your program. Reviewers should not have to search the answer for
the necessary information or try to interpret agency-specific terminology. Unfortunately, eGrants does not allow for
any formatting, bulleted or numbered lists, or paragraphs. The system also has
problems recognizing special characters. Some applicants write the content of
their grant applications in a Word or Pages document and then copy and paste
the information into eGrants. If you choose to do this, make sure the text is plain
text without any formatting before copying and pasting. This will prevent
issues such as apostrophes showing up as question marks and other format
conversion issues. Save often. At the bottom of each section is a ‘save and
continue’ button which allows you to save the information that has been
entered and keeps you on the same page. The ‘Save’ button will save the
information and take you back to the grant application detail page. The eGrants system times out after 20 minutes of inactivity; however, it occasionally
times out before that and while you are working on the grant. It is important to
save regularly. Applicants have to provide evidence of effectiveness in two
sections of the narrative. All applicants must provide the data themselves. The
division will not do calculations on behalf of any applicants. In addition to
providing quantitative data, applicants will provide a narrative explanation of
the data. There is a section in the narrative called ‘alignment with
workforce’ with six questions relating proposed activities to the local
workforce plan. The six questions are listed three times. This is to allow
applicants providing services in multiple local workforce areas to
address each area (up to three) individually. So all applicants must
complete the six questions for workforce area one. Only applicants applying to
serve two or three local areas have to complete the questions under workforce
areas sections 2 & 3. The maximum total score in the alignment word workforce
section is 12 points, regardless of how many workforce areas are addressed.
Scores from multiple areas will be averaged to get the total score. If
applicants choose not to propose corrections education services or to
apply for additional optional tutoring program funds
they have to open the sections, answer ‘no’ to the
first questions in each, and then enter ‘n/a’ for each of the questions. This will
allow the section to be marked complete, which is necessary in order to submit
the grant for review. In the program sites and class schedule under the
applicant information, applicants first create a list of class locations. After
adding all of the class locations, you must click the ‘save and continue ‘button
at the bottom of the screen. This will create a drop-down list of class
locations in the first column of the class schedule in the first column of
the supplemental class schedule sections. All applicants must complete the class
schedule section. Applicants should use the supplemental class section only if
they are planning to provide supplemental face-to-face classes as
defined in Section 403.3 of the adult education and family literacy
guidelines. Do not list supplemental distance learning opportunities in the
schedule. The tutoring schedule should only be completed by agencies that are
applying for the additional optional tutoring program funds. The information
in the agency activity summary should reflect the activities that the agency
proposes to provide. The table requires you to propose the number of students
the program will enroll in four different components and the dollar
amount requested for each: Adult Basic Education (ABE) institutional, ASE/GED
institutional, ABE community-based, and ASE/GED community-based. ‘Institutional’
refers to services in correctional or other residential facilities that are
not open to the public. ABE (Adult Basic Education) includes adult basic education
services from beginning literacy ABE through high intermediate ABE plus
all of the ESL educational levels. ASE/ GED includes services only at low and
high adult secondary education levels. In the adult basic education direct service
grant application, applicants must add the federal and state adult education
budgets and the optional tutoring program budget, if applicable, after
creating the main application. In eGrants, they referred to as sub-grants
or sub-projects. Once you create the main grant, at the bottom of the grant details
page, there’s a button to click that says ‘add sub-grants’. Before completing the
budgets, review section 600-609 of the Adult Education and Family
Literacy Guidelines. This covers allowable uses of funds, how
to allocate allowable costs to the budget, and other fiscal requirements.
Please note that in some cases, the division of adult education uses the
function and object codes differently than does PDE’s division of federal
programs. Applicants must refer to the Adult Education and Family Literacy
Guidelines when completing the budgets. The Federal Adult Education sub-grant
requires a 25% local match. The guidelines provide information on how to
correctly calculate your required local match and related requirements.
Applicants should plan for the purchase of approved standardized assessments in
their budgets. The division of adult education is implementing the use of Tab
11-12 in program year 2018-19. Furthermore, the division anticipates changes to
other approved assessments based on decisions at the federal level. WIOA has specific requirements regarding
administrative costs of federally-funded Adult Basic Education funding. The
division of adult education uses function code 2300 for these
administrative costs. Under WIOA, administrative costs are capped at five
percent of the grant amount. The following costs are considered
administrative costs, which means they must be charged to function code 2300:
all administrative activities including fiscal, human relations, and other
administrative grant activities, planning costs, including the costs associated
with planning, and coordination with workforce system partners, the PA
CareerLink infrastructure costs paid from the grants and costs of contracted
professional development. The cost of contracted professional development
refers to funds paid to the larger agency to cover the cost of mandated
agency professional development or training, and the fees paid to outside
professional development providers or consultants. It does not refer to adult
education staff time participating in professional development activities. It
also does not refer to the work of the in-house professional development
specialists and the program administrators and coordinators,
supporting and leading staff professional development activities.Aany
restricted indirect costs charged to the grant are also considered administrative
costs and are included in the five percent cap. WIOA allows the division
to agree to, through negotiations with local programs, a higher amount when the
five percent cap is too restrictive to allow for adequate planning and
administration. Applicants that believe that they have a strong case for a
waiver to the 5 percent cap should budget the expected administrative costs.
The division will consider the request when successful applications are being
processed. Please note that the priority for waivers will be given to allow
successful applicants to meet the requirements to contribute
to PA CareerLink infrastructure costs. please note that all LEAs are assigned
restricted indirect cost rates by the Pennsylvania Department of Education – not
the division, but by the Department of Education. It has come to my attention
that many LEAs do not yet have approved restricted indirect cost rates,
and therefore, until there is an approved rate, you will not be allowed to charge
your restricted indirect costs. That applies to LEAs only. This concludes
the Adult Basic Education Direct Service grant application webinar. If you have
any questions, please submit them to our resource email address at [email protected] Put ‘Adult Basic Education Direct Service 064’ in the subject line.
Division of adult education staff will periodically post responses to submitted
questions on the division of adult education grant competitions web page
for all applicants to review. Do not send questions directly to division staff.
Thank you.

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