A tour of the British Isles in accents.


Received pronunciation is the great
communicator as soon as you deviate from that and you
go into London speech for example then you lose a little bit of the
communication. cockney is based on East Anglian Suffolk, Norfolk, Cambridgeshire, this is
often by actors confused with the West Country
where the R’s come in and then you get Dorset and Somerset get into Cornwall.
Devon’s slightly different it goes into the nose bit more like that then you go up north to Yorkshire it’s nice
if you get a word that’s got one on the predominant
sounds in it like yark sheer then you cross the Pennines into Lancashire
where he gets much more flexible and fluid in the mouth Liverpool is there too, you know, it’s
Scouse it’s a mixture of all kinds of sounds one of
those is Northern Irish with the rising
inflections but you don’t get the rising
inflections down in Dublin where it has that poetic quality which is
sometimes thought of as being not different from
Highland speech which is also quite poetic and almost
Scandinavian and then you come down to Glasgow and
into the Lowlands of Scotland where you get glottal stops and things like that.
Then you come down the west coast and you’re in Wales, North
Wales where it’s breathy like that and down
into South Wales where you get much heavier and Welsh people who sometimes even sound a bit drunk.

100 thoughts on “A tour of the British Isles in accents.”

  1. Much of Scottish speech is influenced by the Norse folks especially with slang words used in the Scots tongue like Bairn for baby, Noo for now, alane for alone and a whole bunch of other words mostly dying in Scotland now. The regional accents in Scotland will pretty much be gone in the next 20 – 40 years. The Irish(Rep) and much of the North of Scotland is hugely influen Ed by those funky Norse men.

  2. Anglian, Brummie, black ghetto london, Cockney, Cornish, Manc, Jordie, Scouse, southerner, Wales high and low, East midlands, Yorkshire, Scottish highlands and lowlands, lancashire, Irish, N Irish and posh rich accent

  3. Anglian, Brummie, black ghetto london, Cockney, Cornish, Manc, Jordie, Scouse, southerner, Wales high and low, East midlands, Yorkshire, Scottish highlands and lowlands, lancashire, Irish, N Irish and posh rich accent

  4. as a dubliner i can say you are 100 percent correct, but i'm disappointed you gave up the chance to talk about the cork accent

  5. Why are people so stupid, Ireland isn’t a part of Britain!!!!! Only northern is cause the bastards robbed part of our country

  6. Dear Youtube Algorithm,

    Why is this in my recommendations? I'm German from Hanover, where we speak german with almost no accent… why on earth are you showing me the accents of the british isles?

    To the creator of the Video: Great work! I find it very hard to understand people in bavaria, not to mention speeking "Bayrisch". Speeking the dialects of a lot of regions in england is realy a masterful performance!

    SInercly
    Benjamin

  7. Slipped Birmingham and just did a shit fake Jason statham of london your northern Irish and Welsh was shit to fuck you shite video

  8. I love how that video ended. Wish you’d mentioned the Gog Welsh accent which combines Scouse and Welsh to create something….. interesting

  9. I live in Devon and there's not really an accent down here, we're just surrounded by cornwall and Bristol which do have strong accents

  10. Dorset isnt really west country cos 99% of us is from bournemouth christchurch and poole which really should be one city (city of wessex)

  11. ‚Recieved pronunciation is the great communicator‘ ExCusE me but during my time in Scotland this year I got the impression that Scottish people are not able to switch to ‚BBC English‘ because it was obvious that they were talking to a foreigner and they still kept on speaking the way they do (I‘m not mad though their accent is beautiful!).

  12. What has Dublin got to do with the British Isles yous English have such a hard on for our little piece of land but it'll never be yours 🇮🇪🇮🇪🇮🇪

  13. Cockney had the right sound to it, but the pronounciation was off. You can especially hear it in the word "little" which should have a glottal stop and also the "-le" at the end should sound more like a "W".

  14. I had mandatory british english education starting from my country's year 5, most of my english is self taught and I am absolutely sure that if I moved anywhere other than London I would not understand anyone.

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